Are you a subscriber but don’t have an online account?

Register for full online access.

 
 
 
 
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 27 of 27
  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    2,460

    Default Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    Must have rained before they got the roof on, if swelling is what happened. Rain on the outside surface shouldn't have gotten to the OSB

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,819

    Default Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted S. View Post
    The biggest problem with the Huber Products is that there are no real competitors.
    If you mean premium OSB subfloor with a no-sand guarantee, I think there are a couple of competitors. If you mean the Zip system sheathing, I think there is a competitor out west somewhere like Colorado.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Martinez, California
    Posts
    14,988

    Default Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    I see that the EPA is going to be following California on it's regulation of composite wood products, even with $37,500 per day fines.

    Quote Originally Posted by California Air Resources Board
    Formaldehyde is produced on a large scale worldwide. One major use includes the production of wood binding adhesives and resins. The Air Resources Board (ARB) evaluated formaldehyde exposure in California and found that one of the major sources of exposure is from inhalation of formaldehyde emitted from composite wood products containing urea-formaldehyde resins. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reclassified formaldehyde from "probably carcinogenic to humans" to "carcinogenic to humans" in 2004, based on the increased risk of nasopharyngeal cancer. Formaldehyde was also designated as a toxic air contaminant (TAC) in California in 1992 with no safe level of exposure. State law requires ARB to take action to reduce human exposure to all TACs.¹
    But as I've reported before all formaldehyde-free OSB is testing positive for mold, I've even shown where my own formaldehyde-free plywood is developing mold.

    Looking at California's list of manufacturers who have complied with state requirements I see Huber is absent, interestingly Flakeboard has complied.

    For California contracators:

    Quote Originally Posted by 2013 California Green Code
    AS.504.4.S.1 No added formaldehyde [Tier 1]. Use composite wood products approved by the California Air Resources Board (ARB) as no-added formaldehyde (NAF) based resin or ultra-low emitting formaldehyde(ULEF) resins.
    ¹ http://www.arb.ca.gov/toxics/compwood/compwood.htm
    Last edited by Dick Seibert; 07-25-2014 at 11:27 AM.
    “It is not an endlessly expanding list of rights —the “right” to an education; the “right” to health care; the “right” to food and housing. That is not freedom. That is dependency. Those are not rights. Those are the rations of slavery – hay and a barn for human cattle.” - Alexis de Tocqueville

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    4,828

    Default Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    You're ahead of your time, Mr. Seibert.

    They won't appreciate you posts until we are both long gone.
    "First we finish the game, then we’ll deal with the Armada!"

    Sir Frances Drake

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Martinez, California
    Posts
    14,988

    Default Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted
    They won't appreciate you posts until we are both long gone.
    Ted:

    I'm not so sure, you know how I've always said to avoid dual barriers at all costs? I've told that I've been installing my shear plywood on the interior rather than the exterior to avoid the dual barrier and avoid the problems and complexities of rain screens? Even the Greenies are starting to come around:

    Quote Originally Posted by GBA
    I'm a bit surprised no one has mentioned one solution would be to remove the organic material layer that can/will potentially mold (OSB or plywood). Why couldn't the code state that if exterior continuous impervious insulation is used, wood structural sheathing would not be allowed. Hence, older traditional forms of wall bracing could be used - i.e. let in bracing. I know this still opens up the opportunity for potential condensation at the wall stud, but won't it be very minimal or possibly non existent?¹
    And:

    Quote Originally Posted by GBA
    You might ask where the shear wall goes. If your home is fairly simple, you can save 50% to 75% of the shear wall materials if you ask a structural engineer to spec out shear walls nailed on the exterior wall studs from the inside. I have done this a few times with very good results. Plus, no issues with dew points. I am also in zone 6. Some would call it outsulation. Good luck.¹
    They're not there yet, they are still trying to incorporate styrofoam into their walls, by the time they do get there styrofoam will be outlawed internationally because of the environmental damage it does.


    ¹ http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...#post_comments
    “It is not an endlessly expanding list of rights —the “right” to an education; the “right” to health care; the “right” to food and housing. That is not freedom. That is dependency. Those are not rights. Those are the rations of slavery – hay and a barn for human cattle.” - Alexis de Tocqueville

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    1,761

    Default Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    Does all that Zip tape count as a second vapor barrier when we use a first vapor barrier on the interior? I wonder the same thing about Ice and Water Barrier or sill/window details. Did someone determine an exterior vapor barrier is inconsequential, as long as it is less than a certain percentage?

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Houston & Washington Texas
    Posts
    12,206

    Default Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by johnny watt View Post
    Does all that Zip tape count as a second vapor barrier when we use a first vapor barrier on the interior? I wonder the same thing about Ice and Water Barrier or sill/window details. Did someone determine an exterior vapor barrier is inconsequential, as long as it is less than a certain percentage?
    I'm not sure Zip Wall with taped seams is a vapor barrier, I do know it is an air barrier. I am starting to like it better than CDX sheathing and Tyvek. But I do not like it without an additional WRB like Tyvek or felt.
    ============================================

    Twitter

    Houzz

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    1,761

    Default Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    Allan, I was referring to the tape itself.
    I recently had a huge shed dormer with a low pitch that required the entire dormer to be covered with ice and water shield per asphalt shingle instructions. When it came time for spray foam, I left a vented space between the foam and that roof. It got me wondering about the effects of anything waterproof that you apply to the exterior in our climate. Things must dry sideways and then out in the case of of tape or normal ice and water shield. But at some point, if it is large enough, it probably doesn't dry properly.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Northern Vermont
    Posts
    404

    Default Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    The problem with Zip Sheathing is that it's just regular OSB with a weather barrier applied to it. It's NOT Advantech with a weather barrier.

    Pictures are of 1 year old Zip sheathing with an edge that was exposed to a lot of water (kind of like the bottom of a wall might be).
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #25
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Northeast Ohio
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by Catspaw View Post
    The problem with Zip Sheathing is that it's just regular OSB with a weather barrier applied to it. It's NOT Advantech with a weather barrier.

    Pictures are of 1 year old Zip sheathing with an edge that was exposed to a lot of water (kind of like the bottom of a wall might be).
    Catspaw,

    I'm not just using the Zip sheathing though, which, would be similar to using OSB and Tyvek.

    My post referred to Zip R-sheathing, which has foam attached.

    I don't plan on leaving exposed sheathing on my project.

    Brian

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Houston & Washington Texas
    Posts
    12,206

    Default Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    This is Zip Wall on a house we have under construction, it has been up for 6 weeks. Tape will be applied.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    SF Bay Area (East Bay)
    Posts
    2,443

    Default Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by Allan Edwards View Post
    This is Zip Wall on a house we have under construction, it has been up for 6 weeks. Tape will be applied.
    Allan, you have other systems (moment frames, etc.) for the lateral loads in that axis, correct?

    We'd never get away with that nailing here unless the ply was non-structural, I assume it's the same for you.
    “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts