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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Default Removing acrylic finish (stucco)

    I'm sure there is not going to be a lot of feedback on this but I have a situation where an unknown brand of acrylic finish coat applied over another unknown brand of acrylic finish is delaminating from the underlying cement surface. The original cement surface seems to show a coating of some type similar to paint.

    These coatings are all on a 3' high retaining wall that is about 60' long. The level of finish failure is such that I know we have to get it all off and analyze the underlying material before making a decision about what method to use to renew the surface.

    Although there are many areas where the finishes seem to peel off easily....there are areas where they seem well bound.

    I am anticipating scraping the wall with a variety of edge tools but does anyone have any experience dealing with this issue??

    BTW, I'm not so interested in understanding why it failed, I have several suspicions, removal is the primary concern.
    "ALS IK KAN" - Stickley

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Michigan
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    7,490

    Default Re: Removing acrylic finish (stucco)

    If the surface is not hideously rough, PeelAway 7.
    http://www.dumondchemicals.com/home-peel-away-7.html

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Houston & Washington Texas
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    12,104

    Default Re: Removing acrylic finish (stucco)

    If you are talking about removing acrylic paint from stucco, a power washer would probably work.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Removing acrylic finish (stucco)

    Thanks dg and Allan. This finish is the equivalent of an EIFS finish coat....actually one over another over paint ( or perhaps a bonding agent) on a poured concrete wall.

    I actually had a chance to try a heat gun and a couple of scrapers. Using the heat gun and a 2" scraper I work a horizontal break about halfway up the 36" height of the wall. I also used the heat at the top edge to create a point whereby I could push down behind the finish coats with the 4" angled scraper. The finishes seemed to peel well in these 18" long ribbons.

    After getting the procedure worked out I left two of my guys there and in the 3 hours before the rain hit they got about 80 sq.ft. cleaned to the concrete surface. I'm not saying this would be the best method for a large wall but for the few hundred sq. ft. we have to get done it is seemingly effective.

    I thought of using the pressure washer also but didn't want to scatter bits of debris all over the nearby shrub and flower beds and into the pool.

    I've also thought of using a roofing torch to quickly go over the surface and maybe pop it enough to loosen from the concrete, maybe I'll try that on Monday.

    Thanks for the consideration, after it's all cleaned off I may have to ask for suggestions to redress the wall. There are no cracks other than where the expansion joint should have been placed, at about the 30' mark.
    "ALS IK KAN" - Stickley

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Houston & Washington Texas
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    Default Re: Removing acrylic finish (stucco)

    Calvert:

    If the substrate is a concrete wall, it might be easier to just lathe and plaster over what you have & leave all the crud on the existing wall, than an extensive removal and re-finish. Just a thought.
    Last edited by Allan Edwards; 04-12-2014 at 10:42 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Posts
    92

    Default Re: Removing acrylic finish (stucco)

    I have a Bosch 1/2" hammer drill with a separate hammer function. It works great for scraping/material removal on concrete. With a 3" chisel that is kept sharp with an angle grinder it takes a lot of the difficult hand scraping out of jobs like this.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    4,762

    Default Re: Removing acrylic finish (stucco)

    I'd also address the top of the wall to keep the water out. Probably the reason for the failed coatings.
    "First we finish the game, then we’ll deal with the Armada!"

    Sir Frances Drake

  8. #8
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    Nov 2007
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    Dallas,PA
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    Default Re: Removing acrylic finish (stucco)

    Thanks Ablesupe, I was today considering using a sawzall with the scraper blade attachment, so again, another experiment for Monday.

    Ted S., I am cleaning off the top of wall and the several inches that extend down the backside as well. The odd thing is, the top of the wall (about 14" wide and flat) where the snow and water set, doesn't show any failure.

    The failures are scattered about, low, high and middle. Bubbled areas that have not yet split open do hold water and I've seen some pockets of re-liquified acrylic polymer.

    Allan, this wall extends to a perpendicular wall which includes steps down to the pool walkway. The objective is to get all of the wall and step surfaces to the same texture and finish. If we can remove all of the existing finish and the underlying construction is of reasonable integrity, then the organization that owns the property would be happy to have that original construction finished with mineral silicate paint. You have to remember that here in the mid-Atlantic region the damage done by freeze-thaw cycles is a force to be reckoned with and the application of another "layer" can also just result in another potential failure. With that in mind I figured the best approach would be to get back to the original construction.
    "ALS IK KAN" - Stickley

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Dallas,PA
    Posts
    1,043

    Default Re: Removing acrylic finish (stucco)

    Thanks Ablesupe, I was today considering using a sawzall with the scraper blade attachment, so again, another experiment for Monday.

    Ted S., I am cleaning off the top of wall and the several inches that extend down the backside as well. The odd thing is, the top of the wall (about 14" wide and flat) where the snow and water set, doesn't show any failure.

    The failures are scattered about, low, high and middle. Bubbled areas that have not yet split open do hold water and I've seen some pockets of re-liquified acrylic polymer.

    Allan, this wall extends to a perpendicular wall which includes steps down to the pool walkway. The objective is to get all of the wall and step surfaces to the same texture and finish. If we can remove all of the existing finish and the underlying construction is of reasonable integrity, then the organization that owns the property would be happy to have that original construction finished with mineral silicate paint. You have to remember that here in the mid-Atlantic region the damage done by freeze-thaw cycles is a force to be reckoned with and the application of another "layer" can also just result in another potential failure. With that in mind I figured the best approach would be to get back to the original construction.
    Last edited by calvert; 04-12-2014 at 09:44 PM. Reason: Sorry for double post.
    "ALS IK KAN" - Stickley

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