Are you a subscriber but don’t have an online account?

Register for full online access.

 
 
 
 
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23
  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    544

    Default Re: TimberSIL failing in New Orleans

    Quote Originally Posted by charles View Post
    Dang! I was just about to try this for some raised vegetable beds. Is there any non-toxic alternative that lasts longer than cedar in ground contact? This is practically a buried application.
    Concrete lumber;

    https://concretelumber.com

    Tom

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    midwestish
    Posts
    7,201

    Default Re: TimberSIL failing in New Orleans

    Quote Originally Posted by tjbnwi1 View Post
    Concrete lumber
    Have you used that Tom? I loved this bit;
    Concrete Lumber is a patented stress-reinforced structural cementitious composite that is strong, chemical free and low maintenance. It is an affordable outdoor alternative to wood, steel, composites, LVL and glulams.
    “I find the curiosity of our men with respect to this animal is pretty much satisfied.”
    ~ Meriwether Lewis

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    544

    Default Re: TimberSIL failing in New Orleans

    I know someone who is field testing it. I have not had a chance to go play with it yet.

    Tom

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    SF Bay Area (East Bay)
    Posts
    2,144

    Default Re: TimberSIL failing in New Orleans

    Quote Originally Posted by tjbnwi1 View Post
    Concrete lumber;

    https://concretelumber.com

    Tom
    What's it reinforced with?
    kevin
    “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Suburbia (Washington, DC area)
    Posts
    1,935

    Default Re: TimberSIL failing in New Orleans

    Beezo, that made me laugh out loud and my family looked at me funny!

    I have been building garden edging/raised beds out of ordinary, untreated lumber. I get scraps off the site, a leftover 2x6 or 2x10 here or there. They only last maybe four or five years, then I need more...no big deal...no chemicals...no worries about failing materials...no masonry.

    The last one I did with sticks jammed in the ground (tried "heat treating" the ends in the patio fire bowl), then woven with the unending supply of vines my yard produces. Again it will not last forever but I have enough sticks and vines to keep this going longer than I will be able to!

    It's just another approach--forget the longevity and relax.
    Though if we had reliable supplies of black locust or even hemlock I would use them!

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    midwestish
    Posts
    7,201

    Default Re: TimberSIL failing in New Orleans

    Quote Originally Posted by ThingOfBeauty View Post
    Though if we had reliable supplies of black locust or even hemlock I would use them!
    If scraps are handy, nothing wrong with self-composting retainers. Last ones I made were masonry since I have ample supply of sand and stone and it's more resistant to blackberry intrusion and able to hold a cold frame better in 50-60 mph breeze.

    Back to black locust though, it [some bark] was just used recently to date the Adena Mound [Ohio] to around 40 A.D.
    “I find the curiosity of our men with respect to this animal is pretty much satisfied.”
    ~ Meriwether Lewis

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,807

    Default Re: TimberSIL failing in New Orleans

    Quote Originally Posted by tjbnwi1 View Post
    Concrete lumber;

    https://concretelumber.com

    Tom
    Cool stuff. I wonder if http://www.substiwood.com/ is the same.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,807

    Default Re: TimberSIL failing in New Orleans

    Quote Originally Posted by kfc510 View Post
    What's it reinforced with?
    kevin
    I'm told both fiberglass and steel.

    Quote Originally Posted by charles View Post
    Cool stuff. I wonder if http://www.substiwood.com/ is the same.
    Definitely not, since substiwood is full of fly ash and I'm told Concrete Lumber has none.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts