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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Branford, CT 06405
    Posts
    3,652

    Default stainable? wood filler?

    After searching around it appears that the "stainable" part of wood fillers is still somewhat questionable?

    I've used minwax and Zar and Famowood and.... I'm wondering if there is anything new that holds promise?

    Remember Stainable is one part; the other is natural oil finishes, like Tung Oil finishing?

    Thanks
    jim
    Take Care

    Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    544

    Default Re: stainable? wood filler?

    As a straight up stainable, not really anything out there. Best thing I have found so far are the water based Bona floor fillers.

    What I use is baking powder mix with a matching dye, I let it dry to a cake then crumble it, pack it in what needs to be filled, drip CA glue onto the patch, use a CA that does set quickly. I've used various finishes over this filler, works very well.

    Tom

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Branford, CT 06405
    Posts
    3,652

    Default Re: stainable? wood filler?

    Tom
    I understand your procedure but using CA glue precludes one from any adjusting of the patch color, correct? Seems like if someone isn't doing stain-grade work on a regular basis it would be easy to make a highlighted patch?

    How about some more info on the Bona fillers? I'm willing to try. In particular I want something that work with Cherry, both stained or tung oiled!
    Take Care

    Jim

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    544

    Default Re: stainable? wood filler?

    Yes, you could get the patch off color if your not careful. I have found that when the baking powder is wet is is the best time to match. Dry it will be duller and lighter.

    Here is the link to the Bona filler. You'll need to get both of their cherry fillers, the Brazilian is more red. I like that I can mix a colorant into the filler, really helps get it right. It does take stain better than most other fillers when dry, but it is not perfect. Every finish I use works well over the Bona filler, including oil.

    http://www.bona.com/en-US/United-Sta...ona-Resident1/

    Tom

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    midwestish
    Posts
    7,203

    Default Re: stainable? wood filler?

    http://www.glitsa.com/productsDetail.php?prod=11

    http://www.bona.com/en-US/United-Sta...ona-Resident1/

    http://artdec.ca/en/p/21/binder-for-wood-filler

    The glitza requires you to add your own wood flour and is solvent based [similar to plastic wood stuff...] and the bona is pre-colored. There are dry wood flour mixes out there as well and of course you can add a bit of plaster or water putty to you homemade wood flour. You can mod them by adding more wood flour, suitable tinting color[s]. You will have a hard time finding a one size fits all readymade though depending on wood species, finish[es], viewing distance, etc., and may want/need to carry process through on scrap[s] until satisfied.
    “I find the curiosity of our men with respect to this animal is pretty much satisfied.”
    ~ Meriwether Lewis

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    7,468

    Default Re: stainable? wood filler?

    I've used species-specific wood filler putty from a hardwood flooring dealer. Comes in a tub and it's what refinishers use to fill gaps between boards. It was solvent based. Seemed to work fine on floors. Can't recall the brand.

    Are you talking about a highly visible location at eye level where it must be a perfect match?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Branford, CT 06405
    Posts
    3,652

    Default Re: stainable? wood filler?

    No, in this project I'm going to be building some stereo equipment cases to replicate the original style. I typically have tight miters, and few if any 18g brad hole, or I use a micro pinner. These will be cherry, walnut and mahogany, sometimes veneer, sometimes solid stock.

    What prompted this query is I'm making one special case for myself in Chestnut and the board for one piece slipped some and so the cut has a small area in the middle of the piece where it may not draw up tight, subsequently some fill action may be needed. Of course it's along a top edge :-( There is absolutely no play in the side piece to run it thru again taking off a hair, because there is no hair to play with. If I was to recut, or sand the edge, there's a good chance the front would then be too tight and not allow the faceplate to properly recess. If I then sand the recess, the reveal edge will change. I do not have any extra pieces to glue up which would not highlight grain issues. One solution is too assemble the case and use a router to recut the recess, trimming the inside corners with a sharp chisel.

    However, I know some fillers work reasonably well, especially for a fine-line crack or a few pin holes. Perhaps I'm looking for something I usually would not need, other than again minor touch-ups.
    Last edited by James Eggert; 12-18-2013 at 12:23 PM.
    Take Care

    Jim

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Dallas,PA
    Posts
    1,040

    Default Re: stainable? wood filler?

    Jim, I did a stairway earlier this year in reclaimed chestnut and used the "Timbermate Chestnut" filler from Woodcraft. It is a water based material that can be blended with other colors in the family to create a more appropriate match. In my case I added some cherry to the chestnut to get a better match for my boards.

    It stained fine but I've yet to see a filler I couldn't pick out, usually based on the break in the grain pattern and chestnut has a lot of grain!
    "ALS IK KAN" - Stickley

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    41.88N -88.2W
    Posts
    611

    Default Re: stainable? wood filler?

    Jim, your best bet is to have a furniture re-finisher fix it after it's been stained, no type of wood filler will match.
    I have a guy that does wonders with waxes, crayons, and markers.

    Try and create a method using no visible fasteners. At the very most I wouldn't use anything bigger than a 23ga. micro pin.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    midwestish
    Posts
    7,203

    Default Re: stainable? wood filler?

    Then there make them visible and be proud of it. Remember if you feel you have to fill before finishing there's no law that says you have to 1) use just one product and 2) that whatever you do use can't be done with several applications/colors.
    “I find the curiosity of our men with respect to this animal is pretty much satisfied.”
    ~ Meriwether Lewis

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