Are you a subscriber but don’t have an online account?

Register for full online access.

 
 
 
 
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1

    Default Veneer plaster patching:

    I'm not a DIY homeowner ( in a sense) but a Master Plumber in business for 40+ years. I have built numerous houses for myself. I am in the process of selling the house I now live in. The prospective buyers had a "home inspector" inspect the building. The only thing he found was a spot of slightly peeling paint in a second floor bedroom ceiling. So he poked a hole through the spot and now there is a hole in what was an absolutely flat imperial skim coat plaster painted ceiling. There was the main plumbing vent above the hole that had the rubber seal fail and water leaked in during recent winter storms. I have replaced the roof flange.

    The problem is the hole. I have access from above. I have cut a lot of holes in skim coated drywall. What is the best way to patch it without it showing badly that it was patched? I never noticed the "spot" and I'm a little annoyed that the "inspector" blew a hole in a ceiling that wasn't showing any serious damage. A 12" X 16" patch will do. Should I sand and feather the skim coat on the existing board so I can use mesh tape? I'm trying to make it as un noticeable as possible. I'll have to paint the whole ceiling and the wall next to it so it matches.

    Any thoughts or suggestions are appreciated.
    Last edited by Icesailor; 04-06-2013 at 09:21 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Dallas,PA
    Posts
    1,056

    Default Re: Veneer plaster patching:

    You can just clean up the edges of the hole and glue a piece of drywall or plywood in place above the hole followed by an application of "hot mud" such as Durabond 20 or Durabond 45. You can then put a light top coat of spackling paste over that. You can lightly sand to flush up the new surface to the original. You don't really need tape if you use the hot mud.

    If you really have to make a patch 12" x 16" you could glue and screw a piece of drywall in place and leave a 1/4" gap around the patch and fill with hot mud as above and skim and sand. Don't use mesh tape.
    Last edited by calvert; 04-06-2013 at 10:57 PM.
    "ALS IK KAN" - Stickley

  3. #3

    Default Re: Veneer plaster patching:

    I have access from above.

    Where the water leaked, it caused the board to "cup" down and I can see that the board has pulled away from the strapping. That's why the 12" X 16" patch I am thinking of doing. Durabond is a consideration.

    I've cut a lot of holes in veneer plaster in my time. I never cut out willy-nilly but always on solid backing. I leave it for the Patcher to do their job right. That said, I've never seen a "patch" that didn't look like a patch. Especially in a ceiling. I was afraid of joint cracking without mesh tape. Cutting the old wallboard usually leaves a raised edge which ends up higher than the new board. I wanted to grind it off and lower it for mesh tape. The walls and ceiling are all the same color, a semi-gloss eggshell off-white alkyd oil paint that may not be made anymore so either way, it has become a project, not of my doing. This "spot" was next to a closet with a ceiling opening in the closet. If the guy had looked in there first, before blowing a hole in the ceiling, I wouldn't be in this mess. The board, although had been wetted, didn't have any holes in it. And the leak was because the rubber boot on the flashing had failed.

    I just want to do it right. Its a personal character defect of mine. The plumbing and heating I do for my customers is meant to last. So is what I do for myself.

    Maybe I shouldn't worry about it. In another month or so, I won't live here.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Dallas,PA
    Posts
    1,056

    Default Re: Veneer plaster patching:

    Icesailor, if the original blueboard is 1/2" and you have a veneer finish over it then the new piece of drywall will still allow a thickness of durabond and spackling paste to be applied over it and blend flush to the edge of the original material.

    You didn't say if the finish is a one coat or a base and finish plaster system. If you decide to sand or grind into the finish coat to provide for taping be prepared for a bit of a task as the veneer plaster "one coat" material is quite hard and the base coat in a two coat system is even harder.

    As I stated in my earlier post, if you allow a sizable enough gap between the new blueboard/drywall patch and the original material, something in the 1/4" to 3/8" range, pack it with hot mud and then skim the patch with hot mud followed by the spackling paste, you will then basically be able to lightly sand the surface to be in plane with the original plaster surface.

    If you tape then wet PAPER tape and apply over the joint after sanding a slight bevel into the edge of your original finish material. Wetting the tape will allow you to slick it down to a very tight joint with the assurance that the paper will not be drawing out moisture from the tape and creating a weaker bond to the compound or spackling paste. By the way, I am saying spackling paste and that is what I mean, not pre-mixed joint compound. Paste is a finer particle size than joint compound and more closely approximates the consistency of true lime putty finish plaster.
    "ALS IK KAN" - Stickley

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Peabody, MA
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: Veneer plaster patching:

    Hey Calvert, thanks for the tip. Being a GC I've patched way more holes than I would have liked always using mesh tape , Durabond then compound. I never knew you could get away with no tape. This makes life so much easier.
    I owe you a beer if we ever meet up.
    Ron

  6. #6

    Default Re: Veneer plaster patching:

    Good info here.

    I wanted to add that in a ceiling with flat paint it is going to be very hard to see any reasonably well done patch unless it is going to have a source of light shining across it and towards someones eyes. I strive for perfection too, but if it can't be seen unless someone is standing on a ladder and holding a flashlight across it, than it is perfect enough.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Veneer plaster patching:

    Love the thread. I learned a lot. Thanks for sharing all this info.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: Veneer plaster patching:

    Icesailor,

    You mentioned using mesh tape- there's a relatively new tape available, FibaFuse ( http://www.sg-adfors.com/Brands/Fiba...useDrywallTape .) It's a nonwoven fiberglass tape that that works a little better than either mesh or paper because it's thinner and bubbles & mud can pass right through it. It's not quite as tough as paper or mesh, so you have to be a little gentler, but it's great for patches.

    It's probably available elsewhere, but I found it at The BigOrangeBox- their site said it was in stock at "my" store, but it took the sales associates 20 minutes to actually find it. Only comes in 8" rolls- a lifetime supply for everyone but Ferguson, but only a few bucks, so worth it.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Veneer plaster patching:

    I absolutely second the use of PAPER tape. Using mesh tape always telegraphs the grid through any patch I have ever done. It (paper) is also just a strong a joint. (Have no experience with Fibafuse) What Albaby Chris says is true, too, just make sure to use flat paint. Paint at right angles to the window,if you want to be super careful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Veneer plaster patching:

    Yeah Calvert took the words right out of my mouth. I just made a post about hot mud. (hahaha) But yes that should give you the flushes patch job. Good luck, let us know how things are progressing!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts