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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Default Getting Email on Smart Phone - Sometimes ?

    I've had a Galaxy S2 for a couple of months now. I am sure the email settings for are correct. They are POP3 for Google and Road Runner. Both acct / messages show up on my home PC.

    Say I'm out in the field. I get the email icon but there is no message to view. Or I see the message but when I refresh the acct it disappears.

    I have my PC on all the time at home with Outlook Express polling the server every few minutes for messages. This maybe is the problem ? There's something about not receiving messages in two places --- I'm not sure what this is all about ?

    What is it you guys are doing to make this work right ?
    Last edited by Happy Home; 10-01-2012 at 10:53 AM.
    Steve

    "Get three coffins ready" - A Fistful of Dollars 1964

    http://youtu.be/KZ_7br_3y54

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Martinez, California
    Posts
    15,041

    Default Re: Getting Email on Smart Phone - Sometimes ?

    Steve:

    This has been a real problem for me, rendering my smart phone relatively useless other than just as a telephone.

    I had good performance from my 10-year old Kyocera Palm based smart phone, I upgraded to the Droid X and got great performance both in G Mail and AOL mail, then a few months back AOL started not receiving E-mail for sometimes several hours, rather than try to fix the problem I upgraded to the Razr Maxx thinking I would get the increased battery life as a bonus, but the problem is only worse. I've tried Googling the problem with no luck, I went into Verizon and they said it must be on AOL's end.

    My speculation that it's the incompatibility in the successive Android operating systems, it worked fine in Froyo, stopped working in Gingerbread, and is only worse in Ice Cream Sandwich (4.0.4). I get much better performance in G Mail, and am using it more and more sending E-mails to important people giving them my G Mail address.

    I'm glad you posted this, I was about to buy a Galaxy S thinking that it might solve the problem, but now I know it won't, I think the Galaxy S is running Jelly Bean (4.1). Another option is to make Verizon roll my older Droid X phone back to the original configuration in Froyo, they don't like that but it can be done, my son made them do it for other reasons.
    When fascism comes to America it will not be in brown and black shirts, it will not be with jack-boots, it will be in Nike sneakers and Smiley shirts. Germany lost the Second World War, Fascism won it. George Carlin 1937 - 2008

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, Fire Island
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    5,414

    Default Re: Getting Email on Smart Phone - Sometimes ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Home View Post
    I've had a Galaxy S2 for a couple of months now. I am sure the email settings for are correct. They are POP3 for Google and Road Runner. Both acct / messages show up on my home PC.

    Say I'm out in the field. I get the email icon but there is no message to view. Or I see the message but when I refresh the acct it disappears.

    I have my PC on all the time at home with Outlook Express polling the server every few minutes for messages. This maybe is the problem ? There's something about not receiving messages in two places --- I'm not sure what this is all about ?

    What is it you guys are doing to make this work right ?

    I have the Galaxy S, never had a problem.

    Sync settings?
    Francois


    Truth is just one man's explanation for what he thinks he understands. (Walter Mosley)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Greensboro, NC
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    1,559

    Default Re: Getting Email on Smart Phone - Sometimes ?

    Are you also using another email client to receive messages on another device too ?

    The other day I turned my Outlook Express off at my home PC and I did get the emails on my phone. If that's what has to be done I guess I'll have to do it.

    My OE also polls my Goog acct and sends it to my PC but as Dick said --- I think my Goog messages also appear on my phone with no problem. This ads to the confusion ?

    Francios - If you are just getting your emails from one device I can see why you're not having a problem. Is that the case ?
    Steve

    "Get three coffins ready" - A Fistful of Dollars 1964

    http://youtu.be/KZ_7br_3y54

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Portland, OR
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    2,467

    Default Re: Getting Email on Smart Phone - Sometimes ?

    Sounds like your Outlook Express is downloading e-mails to your PC and not leaving copies on your Google server to be available for your phone to access

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Western Mass
    Posts
    1,667

    Default Re: Getting Email on Smart Phone - Sometimes ?

    I just use the GMail client on my phone ( I am on the S3) and the web client. No worries about syncing that way.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Default Re: Getting Email on Smart Phone - Sometimes ?

    Ok I think I've got it worked out with some help from my friends at http://www.howardforums.com/forums.php

    Have to have settings in such a way to leave a copy of messages on the server.

    G Mail > Settings > Forwarding and POP / IMAP
    > 2) Keep GMail's Copy in the In Box // I did not change this from initial set up so this must be the default setting. This explains why I get gmails through my Outlook Express and my phone no problem.


    Outlook Express (or another email client)
    > Tools > (email) Accounts > Advanced > Delivery > Check box "Leave a copy on message on server"
    (or similar configuration depending on the email client)

    I had to check this option to have a message copy to remain on the server. I now receive messages on my phone when it polls the (Road Runner) server as I would like it too. Same message arrives on my PC via my Outlook Express. And I suppose any other device if set up this way. Now I understand what's going on.
    Steve

    "Get three coffins ready" - A Fistful of Dollars 1964

    http://youtu.be/KZ_7br_3y54

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Default Re: Getting Email on Smart Phone - Sometimes ?

    I'll add that at some point the server email acct will get filled up if your using an email client that doesn't have the option to also delete the message copy from the server in a set number of days. My OE does not have that option. In this case you access the acct from a web browser and delete the messages.

    I'm further told that IMAP doesn't have the problem we're speaking of. Will have to study up on that now I guess.
    Steve

    "Get three coffins ready" - A Fistful of Dollars 1964

    http://youtu.be/KZ_7br_3y54

  9. #9

    Default Re: Getting Email on Smart Phone - Sometimes ?

    I haven't followed this succinctly from the beginning, so this is a bit of armchair quarterbacking but hopefully it will provide some value...

    The first thing to establish is whether you're dealing with a POP mail account or an IMAP mail account - or some hybrid. The rules (and capabilities) for each are very different, and the way you juggle messages with multiple devices will be very different. (before the techies gear up to flame me - yes I realize there are lots of variations of what I'm going to describe here and that this is a gross over-simplification) I'm trying to give you all some background info that will help you figure out your mail routing now that everyone has a phone and a computer and a tablet etc etc.

    POP accounts are dumb - have very little flexibility - but are simple.
    IMAP accounts are smart - lots of flexibility, but also more complexity.

    POP accounts are "Hold'em or Dump'em" at the server. All messages are either moved off the server entirely every time you retrieve mail, or they all stay on the server (and you download a copy). But there are no organizing folders or anything else on the server, and for the most part there is no tracking of whether or not a message was read.

    IMAP accounts allow "real mail management" at the server. You can set up sub-folders to organize your mail which will then synchronize between all your devices...and you can decide how much or little of the message you want to download. The SERVER tracks the state of each message and "knows" if the message was "read", forwarded, etc.


    The POP protocol supports one user - one device. The server is just a stop-over for messages on their way to the recipient. Only one user can connect to an inbox at a time. If you set up sub-folders with a POP account, those folders exist ONLY on your computer or phone, not on the server. And the server doesn't "know" (or care) that you moved something from your Inbox to "Job Messages" or whatever.

    IMAP accounts allow collaboration on mail - they can support multiple simultaneous connections to an inbox, and the server "keeps track" of who is doing what with each message. Folder set-ups are synchronized between the server and all other devices that can connect to the server.

    By now you should be saying "Then... if I want to access my messages from different devices at different times, I should be using an IMAP mail account.

    To which I would say "Yup- it definitely would seem that way". Except some ISPs make a fiasco out of their IMAP set-ups and some mail software you might want to use does a terrible job of supporting IMAP but a good job with POP. Some third-party add-ons only support POP, or maybe the IMAP folder set-up syncs correctly with your PC and Phone, but not with your receptionist's Mac e-mail client. In order for IMAP to really work well in an organization, every device and every client inbox software has to support it in exactly the same way, or you can have all kinds of problems.

    The short answer is IMAP doesn't always work for people/organizations for one reason or another.

    The other issue is cost. ISPs can support hundreds of simple POP inboxes with the admin required for just a handful of IMAP accounts. That's why every $2.99/mo domain hosting account comes with 1001 "email accounts" which are always very simple POP accounts. An IMAP-capable email account costs more like $5-10/user/month (Hosted Exchange accounts for example).

    So anyway - your strategy for routing your messages between devices is going to be different depending on the type of email accounts you have. The best case example is to use IMAP at the server and have devices that all fully support the same version of IMAP.

    If you don't have that -or if you have a mix of email addresses using a mix of protocols - then it gets more complicated. If you have a POP account, I'd be very careful with "Leave Copy of Message on Server". Keep in mind the server is not tracking whether or not some other device connected and got a copy of the message, so you'll have to rely on your memory to determine who you responded to, etc.

    Also remember that most POP accounts don't "remember" the state of a message, so if you leave messages on the server, they'll still be there the next time you retrieve mail and you'll get a second copy of the same message, cluttering your PC's inbox.... until you set one of your devices to "Remove Messages from Server".

    I have a client now who is constantly getting "mailbox full" messages because they are leaving messages on a POP server for their phones - waiting to pick them up later from a desktop PC. So people submitting web forms don't get the acknowledgement, they get an error message instead.... at the same time the client is not receiving the output from the website, because the inbox is always full and can't accept more messages. No good.

    Some ISPs - take Yahoo for example - say they're POP but do use IMAP, but only for mobile devices. That eliminates a bunch of problems. Your mobile device gets a sync of whatever is in the Yahoo inbox and folder structure... but then if you drag the messages down to your PC running Outlook- it's a POP3 connection which wipes the server inbox clean.

    Here's what I do:

    - All of my "domain" mail (mountainconsulting.com etc.) is simply "forwarded" (actually it's a POP 'move') from each of the free mailboxes at various domain hosts.... to my Yahoo Premium mail account. That spam-filters everything with Yahoo's good filters before it hits my 'real' inbox.

    - Next, any mobile devices I'm using (iPhone, Tablet, etc.) can connect to Yahoo via IMAP - they'll get copies of any message I have not already processed somewhere else, This is set up so anything I respond to from my phone gets a copy placed in "sent items" to preserve the message thread. (This is the complication I was referring to earlier... it's not "just" POP or "just" IMAP - Yahoo is big enough that it has developed a hybrid system that doesn't fit either mold perfectly...

    - Then, I pull down whatever is left using POP3 to my laptop, into Outlook. Yahoo uses the simplistic SMTP protocol to send mail, so the only snag in this whole thing is the "reply to" address. Everyone is going to get email that looks like it's coming from however I have the "reply-to" set up in Outlook... regardless of the email address they used to send me mail. I thought this would be a big problem but over many years and 100,000s of messages only one or two people have even mentioned it. (In other words.. .they send a message to "info(at)connectedcontractor.com" and my reply comes from "jstoddard(at)mountainconsulting.com" Nobody seems to pick up on that - or care.

    Another thing you can do (this is a throw-back to Palm/Treo devices) - Pull your messages down from the server to your computer...but then synchronize your handheld device with your computer instead of the mail server. Of course you need a connection between those devices so this is not ideal either if you're trying to get away with only your SmartPhone or tablet.

    So hopefully this demystifies some of the mail issues a bit so you can decide the best way to route your mail / set up your devices.

    JLS
    =====================================
    ((Planning + Process) x Technology) = SUCCESS!

    Joe Stoddard
    Mountain Consulting Group, LLC
    Twitter! http://www.twitter.com/moucon

    How can we help you achieve your goals?
    ====================================

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Default Re: Getting Email on Smart Phone - Sometimes ?

    Thanks a lot Joe for the explanation.

    Maybe a sticky ?
    Steve

    "Get three coffins ready" - A Fistful of Dollars 1964

    http://youtu.be/KZ_7br_3y54

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