Are you a subscriber but don’t have an online account?

Register for full online access.

 
 
 
 
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 33
  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    608

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    I've used these things many times. Two would get you your load up!

    http://www.ur.com/index.php/equipmen...&id=281&page=2

    I've installed 25' parallams, steel beams, etc with no problems.
    No brains, no headaches

    Jeff

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    portland, maine
    Posts
    713

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    Ditto that, Genie Lift is the tool for the job.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Portland, ME
    Posts
    6,302

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    Who is delivering this beam? If I were you I'd schedule it so the boom truck that brings it just sets the damn thing in place. That's what we try to do with big elements.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    hillsborough, nj
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    ill have to look into those genie lifts they look good. i appreciate all the suggestions thanks

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    hillsborough, nj
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    Quote Originally Posted by Dancing Dan View Post
    Who is delivering this beam? If I were you I'd schedule it so the boom truck that brings it just sets the damn thing in place. That's what we try to do with big elements.
    the beam is going in a finished garage so the boom wont help

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    2,184

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    If you don't mind a couple of small holes in the floor above, just run a couple of appropriate ropes or steel cables down from above and lift it up into place using come-alongs, chain hoists, or whatever you can get your hands on. If you have one near each end you'll have excellent control and nobody needs to be underneath it during the lift. You can also add cribbing or other support as you lift to keep it from going very far if something goes wrong.
    HERS Rater • BPI Building Analyst • BPI Envelope Professional
    Certified Green Building Professional • Certified Existing Home Advisor
    General Building Contractor • Asbestos Certification • Hazardous Substance Removal Certification • EPA Approved Lead-Safe Contractor • Locksmith
    PMP • ESEP • CISSP

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Windthorst, TX
    Posts
    70

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    Material lift is what we always used also. Makes it easy,and they are cheap, they rent here for 60 a day i think, and i would pay 200 a day for them lol... Goes from a 4 man job to a two man job. I'm young (27) but have no desire to mess my back up at this point in my life. Work smarter not harder...
    "I'm not convinced that the world is in any worse shape than it ever was . It's just that in this day and age of almost instantaneous communication, we bear the weight our forefathers only read about after they were solved." - Burton Hillis

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    hillsborough, nj
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    Quote Originally Posted by wfoconstruction View Post
    Material lift is what we always used also. Makes it easy,and they are cheap, they rent here for 60 a day i think, and i would pay 200 a day for them lol... Goes from a 4 man job to a two man job. I'm young (27) but have no desire to mess my back up at this point in my life. Work smarter not harder...
    yea i hurt my back once and it hasnt been the same since no need to do it again. ill be looking into those lifts

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Bergen County, NJ
    Posts
    4,410

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    What about LiteSteel Beams? Did you check them out?

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    5,576

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted S. View Post
    I think if I was going to call in a crane, I'd go with a parralam and save nailing the plies.
    It was a 5 1/2"x24"x32' gluelam.

    Tom
    http://chicagocraftsmen.org/2011/06/261.html

    Check with the AHJ, what we say doesn't matter.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Sterling Heights, MI
    Posts
    4,614

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    Quote Originally Posted by tjbnwi View Post
    I can do Ted one better. I had a beam about the same size that had to be placed at about 14' above grade. Installed it with 1 finger. Thats all it took to dial the phone to call a crane.

    Tom
    I can do better. I can use my voice activation on my cell and call my carpenter sub and have him do it all. No fingers!

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    5,576

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    Quote Originally Posted by jimAKAblue View Post
    I can do better. I can use my voice activation on my cell and call my carpenter sub and have him do it all. No fingers!
    You couldn't do that 17 years ago. I was the carpentry sub (and general). I forgot one other step, had to flip the old Motorola Star Tack open.

    Tom
    http://chicagocraftsmen.org/2011/06/261.html

    Check with the AHJ, what we say doesn't matter.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Easton,MA.
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    I have used my Proctor wall jacks to lift some pretty heavy beams.

    Mike

  14. #29

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    If ;you're really determined to use a microlam, get a couple of material lifts from the rental company. They are a lot cheaper than the Emergency Room or the Chiropractor. But you really need to ask yourself why you would want to put a primary load carrying member that is selectable to moisture in a non-aclimated space with a condensation magnet (the concrete floor). Don't know what part of the country you are in, but take a look at this site: http://www.metwood.com/

    I've been using LVLs & Gluelam lumber since it first came on the market, and learned a lot about them, and sometime the lessons were expensive. After using them for a decade, I noticed the ones that were installed as porch beams, garage beams and in low crawl spaces seemed to exhibit a lot more deflection over time than the specs called for (I've been a certified in-house Engineered Lumber Design center since 1994). After dogging the local E/L mfg's rep (no names but they are the Big Dogs) for several years, he finally came clean about it in '07 and admitted that, "yes, LVL's in non-aclimated spaces will creep a bit". Creep is their word for sagging more than the listed deflection over time.

    Ran across the Metwood guys in '06 and I don't use LVL's in those places anymore. In fact, I found out with Metwood beams available I didn't need to use red iron in houses anymore. Other than being lighter, stronger and way, way stiffer than LVL's (and depending your location, cheaper than red iron) I'm not sure why you might want to use them. Oh, did I mention that you can probably get by with a 11 1/4" beam from Metwood, and maybe even a 9 1/4? And that you can run AC ductwork and plumbing lines thru them? I've done some attic upfits with them that would not have been possible with any other type of beam.

    And no, I don't work for them (though I did become a dealer back i '07 since I was using so many before the crash). You can even find them in the back issues of JLC. Check 'em out. Better yet, have your engineer check them out. They are on the east coast but they have dealers all over the US. I still use LVL's, but not when there's "a better way"!

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Greenville,S.C.
    Posts
    377

    Default Re: microlam in garage

    I've lifted many beams in place over the years and it's easy to get complacent about safety. Fortunately I've never had an accident but over 30 years ago our HVAC sub was building an addition to his shop and his crew was lifting a steel beam into place. They had three men lifting one end of a steel beam into a pocket. One man was on a step ladder and it kicked out. The beam came down and sandwiched the ladder man's head between the beam and the concrete slab. He was killed instantly. I've tried never to forget that although the height isn't that high and the task seems simple that even the most familiar jobs can be dangerous.
    When lifting something heavy I try, as others have said, lift incrementally and have something in place to stop the falling member if something goes wrong.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts