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  1. #1

    Default nail & screw storage

    hi guys,
    I am looking at 10+ boxes of various, specific nails and screws, all in their own 1lb. boxes.
    What are you using to store them?
    I've tried storing them in a milk crate, cardboard box, plastic pop crates, etc. and they always seem to end up breaking down and leaking.
    Looking for other ideas.
    Thanks,
    jerry

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Friday Harbor, San Juan Island, Washington
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    13,029

    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    Your worst enemy is the boxes that fasteners are sold in. I immediately dump everything into half-gallon milk cartons that have the tops cut off. You can put several pounds of fasteners into a carton, and you can fit your hand in to pull them out. You can easily see what's in them. A milk crate holds 9 cartons. You can stack the crates. They don't fall over, and if you don't overfill the cartons they won't either. I've probably got 25-30 crates with 9 types of fasteners/parts each. Been doing it this way for ~15 years and will never change.
    Bailer Hill Construction, Inc. - Friday Harbor, WA
    Website - Facebook

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    NJ
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    5,832

    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    For decades I use peanut butter jars because the're pretty tough and utilize what would normally be a waste product. They're extremely inefficient, although they do work.

    These boxes are fantastic that are from HD.. although a little heavy.

    http://forums.jlconline.com/forums/s...47&postcount=6


    Click on the link in the post for HD.
    Chuck

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Danbury area of western CT
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    4,440

    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    I eat a lot of peanuts and cashews. The jars I get them in are basically square, with a large screw top that I can get my mitts into. They fit on shelves in my truck and I turn them so the unlabeled part faces out and i can see the contents at a glance. As Chuck said, they are a waste item that no longer is waste. they are durable and FREE! For smaller quantities of fasteners like specialized screws and anchors that come in 5 or 10 packs, I use a Stanley organizer with removable square "cups" that works well. I have 3 of those.
    The original boxes get tossed right away.


    Phil
    It's better to try and fail, than fail to try.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    1,514

    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    This is an age old dilemma. I've gone through several ways of storing them. I currently have about 12 - 14 Grip Rite 1 lb boxes in one of those heavy duty 26" boxes with the hd sq handle. They don't set in there exactly right however. I need to just pull it around and open it up when I need it. I also have 3 Stanley yellow boxes as said above. Each box holds almost a lb, sometimes more.

    The answer is Grip Rite ought to make a box to hold about 20 - 1 lb boxes.
    Steve

    "Get three coffins ready" - A Fistful of Dollars 1964

    http://youtu.be/KZ_7br_3y54

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    If you are buying nails and screws in one pound box increments you're obviously not using them regularly. I'm an fastener organization nut, so I took Greg Di's advice and bought the Husky organizer boxes from HD for smaller nails and screws. Larger screws and nails go into heavy duty, quartered bucket organizer trays. Three tall or six small, stackable trays fit into a standard five gallon bucket, or a combination of both.
    Richie Poor

    See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil, value engineer your unit prices.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    Quote Originally Posted by always-learning View Post

    http://forums.jlconline.com/forums/s...47&postcount=6 Click on the link in the post for HD.
    Oops...what Chuck said... :p
    Richie Poor

    See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil, value engineer your unit prices.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Oak Forest, IL
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    132

    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    I would also use empty coffee cans.
    Steve

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    down the shore
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    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    I use the bucket boss 5 gal bucket trays. Works OK. Just don't tip over the bucket. You can get about a pound of fasteners in each section. Which means 20 lbs/bucket or more.

    http://www.amazon.com/Bucket-Boss-15.../dp/B00002243J

  10. #10

    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    I bought a ton of those different sized stackable bins,you see em at lowes etc.....yellow,blue ,green etc.......I made a "wall o' fasteners" in my shop...spaced shelves so they are 3 or 4 high......easy to see what's in em.......I have shelves in my truck tool box that they corresspond to........I use bucket boss too but I always forget what's under the first layer,usually use them for seldom used fasteners

  11. #11
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    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    Quote Originally Posted by S.Joisey View Post

    I use the bucket boss 5 gal bucket trays.
    "Ouch!" he said about the current cost. I have a combination of about 30 -3 stack & -6 stack, locally manufactured trays that are at least 15 years old. Paid about $6 - $7 each, They refuse to die. Looks like a good investment.
    Richie Poor

    See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil, value engineer your unit prices.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Suburbia (Washington, DC area)
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    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    Many of the 1-lb boxes can be turned into long-term storage units with 12" of tape. Rip off the end panel rather than one of the larger sides, tape around the box at the edge of the opening, voila a reasonably durable container that fits in your tool belt and won't fall apart. OK, really only medium-long term, but anyway you won't find three of them fallen apart at the bottom of your bucket, they do hold up long enough to use the fasteners.
    I have also been part of the coffee can brigade at times. Built a nice holder, center partition of plywood with handhole at the top, five or six cans long, two rows wide & two deep, definitely a young carpenter's carrier as it probably exceeded 40 lbs at times.
    When I ran handyman/warranty I had four partitioned cases with every type of machine & sheet metal screw in brass, stainless, and regular steel. A few of the guys found out about it and would call me to come to their jobs during punchout just to get screws.
    At this point life's too short to spend hours organizing fasteners, I leave them in their boxes and grab and go.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    Quote Originally Posted by ThingOfBeauty View Post

    At this point life's too short to spend hours organizing fasteners...
    Wait 'til you hit 50... ;)
    Richie Poor

    See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil, value engineer your unit prices.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    86

    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    I like parachute bags. I keep all my galvies in one, ext. screws in one, sheetrock screws, cabinet screws etc. I can fit 4 bags in one HD bucket.
    When mommas happy; everyones happy!

    Chris

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    St Louis, Mo for the past 25 years
    Posts
    7,326

    Default Re: nail & screw storage

    I have tried just about all the ones mentioned here. My van is a combination of them all. About the only one not mentioned is square tupperware containers. I have hit the Goodwill store a time or two and picked up some of them for maybe a 25 each. They are square so you do not loose space like with a round container, the rubber seems to be pretty tough and they are not bothered by the cold weather.

    One of the things that gets my van full is buying 5 lag screws just in case I need another one when really four will do the job. That extra one gets tossed into an area and pretty soon I have 3 but not 4 so I buy two just in case and then the process starts all over. Or like recently I had to buy some almond painted sheet metal screws for some guttering. Used about 25 out of the 100 you buy at a time. I need to sell another job with almond gutters so I can use the rest of them up.

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