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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    mass.
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    401

    Default New crane regulations

    Anyone who uses cranes from swinging trusses to setting shingles on the ridge better read up on these.
    I know for a fact that at least in Ma. the inspectors will be looking for and visiting jobs with a crane boom sticking up!!

    http://www.osha.gov/cranes-derricks/index.html
    12 Hours is only 1/2 a day

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    135

    Default Re: New crane regulations

    I'm sure the two tower crane failures in the upper east side of Manhattan contributed to these changes. The owner of that company was indicted. There were cracks in the turntable and a city inspector claimed to had inspected it but didn't. He got arrested for falsify documents
    I just quickly looked at the OSHA standards. Most are what we do now. Inspection of slings either wire or nylon is standard practice. If the nylon has any fraying or cuts, it goes into the garbage. We cut it up so no one can try to use it. We stay at least 10 ft in all directions away from any electrical lines, in case of an arc. Don't stand under a load and never be in a location where the operator can't see you. The operators all have long boom licenses. We rent rigs, we don't own any.
    They site in the OSHA document of a concrete beam being lifted by two cranes over a river. They lost the load and a crane into the river. That sounds exactly what happened in Belmar NJ a couple of years back on a bridge job. Lifting a load with two cranes in dangerous business. If one of the rigs gets too much of the load, you're finished.

  3. #3
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    Jan 2007
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    mass.
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    401

    Default Re: New crane regulations

    I haven't had the time or patience to read completly thru the whole thing, but our safety officer has seen a few issues we need to update

    Riggers and signal persons must be “qualified” when there will be people in the “fall zone” and when working on assembly and disassembly of cranes and their extensions—which applies to any crane work we do. This can be done in-house, two more things we will have to train for. OSHA says the skill must be demonstrable, so there will be a practical test.

    Real Good News: The new standard clearly states that “J” hooks can be used to install wood trusses.

    All terrain forklifts and backhoes are excluded from this particular standard. A forklift with a jib extension that has a hook on the end does not fall under the new crane regs. However, a forklift with any attachment that has a winch/cable assembly to raise and lower material is covered by the new crane standards and may only be used by a licensed crane operator.
    12 Hours is only 1/2 a day

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    135

    Default Re: New crane regulations

    That's very interesting. I know that the UBC is encouraging guys to get their rigging, forklift, scaffold and other certifications. They offer those classes at their training centers. These changes have been in the pipeline for some time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Danbury area of western CT
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    4,441

    Default Re: New crane regulations

    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony B View Post
    That's very interesting. I know that the UBC is encouraging guys to get their rigging, forklift, scaffold and other certifications. They offer those classes at their training centers. These changes have been in the pipeline for some time.
    Just one more reason we need to weed out the $25/hr guys. Taking time to get certifications, be up on recent regulations, continuing ED for all sorts of segments and all costs time and money. How can we change the prevailing attitude that the cheapest is the best value? I hope this thread can spark a good discussion about the larger issues. Thanks.


    phil
    It's better to try and fail, than fail to try.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    5,891

    Default Re: New crane regulations

    Quote Originally Posted by philthegreek View Post
    Just one more reason we need to weed out the $25/hr guys. Taking time to get certifications, be up on recent regulations, continuing ED for all sorts of segments and all costs time and money.
    The only problem is the $25/hr guys aren't tax paying businesses now so do you think they're going to bother with safety regulations and training?

  7. #7
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    Jan 2009
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    Danbury area of western CT
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    Default Re: New crane regulations

    That's the point! now, how do we fix that? I'd like to see some of the bigger guys like DG and Allan chime in. They have probably got some different angles of looking at this, but they are custom and not production tract guys so they look more to final high quality than nickle and diming to the lowest common denominator. I think the time of not-so-plenty is the right time to address issues that will be of benefit with the times of plenty come back. Maybe I'm just dreaming too.

    Phil
    It's better to try and fail, than fail to try.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    5,891

    Default Re: New crane regulations

    Quote Originally Posted by philthegreek View Post
    That's the point! now, how do we fix that? I'd like to see some of the bigger guys like DG and Allan chime in. They have probably got some different angles of looking at this, but they are custom and not production tract guys so they look more to final high quality than nickle and diming to the lowest common denominator. I think the time of not-so-plenty is the right time to address issues that will be of benefit with the times of plenty come back. Maybe I'm just dreaming too.

    Phil
    Make the owners ultimately responsible for safety on their sites. We brought a law in in the 1990's to deal with just that issue. Fines and penalties increase as they go up the food chain. Worker - supervisor - contractor - owner.

    I can remember working on an area renovation in a hospital during a recession in the early 1990's. Very little of the work was going to established contractors and I met one of the guys doing some very amateurish drywall taping. Turns out he was one of the kitchen staff at the hospital that got hired by some fly by night GC to tape drywall for $8/hr nights and weekends. Today those guys are all gone because the hospital is now responsible for site safety. Before a contractor works on their site (or almost any decent sized corporation) they have to have a written safety policy, everybody on site has to be certified if they're running a forklift, building scaffolding, rigging loads, fall arrest etc. and there is a zero tolerance for safety infractions, get caught at the edge of the roof without being tied off and down the road you go. That's what it took to drive the little hobo's out of our corner of construction. I wonder where they all went?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    midwestish
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    7,344

    Default Re: New crane regulations

    Quote Originally Posted by dave_k View Post
    That's what it took to drive the little hobo's out of our corner of construction. I wonder where they all went?
    They came down here, got a 25¢ raise and run the foreclosure processing in Mozilo's new venture, sustainablerealestate.com
    “I find the curiosity of our men with respect to this animal is pretty much satisfied.”
    ~ Meriwether Lewis

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    361

    Default Re: New crane regulations

    Quote Originally Posted by philthegreek View Post
    Just one more reason we need to weed out the $25/hr guys. Taking time to get certifications, be up on recent regulations, continuing ED for all sorts of segments and all costs time and money. How can we change the prevailing attitude that the cheapest is the best value? I hope this thread can spark a good discussion about the larger issues. Thanks.


    phil

    Who on that NYC crane was makin' only $25/hr. Maybe the inspector in payoffs. Weed out and punish the corrupt and the lowballing will take care of itself.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    5,891

    Default Re: New crane regulations

    Quote Originally Posted by glennwarner View Post
    Who on that NYC crane was makin' only $25/hr. Maybe the inspector in payoffs. Weed out and punish the corrupt and the lowballing will take care of itself.
    That's way oversimplified. There are so may other factors that you can't understand unless you work on these jobs day to day. Factors like tight scheduling, company bonus incentives, hangovers, competition to keep your job, boredom, poor communication, fatigue and all of the above and more in combination. You hear about the big accidents but you don't hear about the day to day crushes, crashes and crap falling out of badly rigged loads.

    I worked on one job where the super ran a tower crane for 6 months without a load limit switch because the repair would come out of his profit sharing bonus and I have never once seen an inspector climb a tower crane once a job is under way to see if everything is working correctly on a crane. Maybe after an accident but you sure don't see them showing up on a weekday and climbing up to take a close look. There's enough stuff on the ground to look at.

    Inspectors don't see the days where the crane operator closed the bar after work then did a 12 hour deck pour the next day in windy conditions. Swinging that jib back and forth every couple of minutes without a break for 12 hours straight gets mesmerizing at the best of times. Throw a untrained swamper guiding him blind by radio while the experienced swamper has lunch and you have a perfect storm. Not for a catastrophic crane collapse but for someone to get a bucket of concrete dropped on their head or someone getting knocked off the building.

    You need trained guys doing these jobs and you have to make the owners ultimately liable for what goes on on their building sites because they control the money, they say who gets the contract, they put the scheduling pressure on the contractors, they dictate the terms. If an owner can lose his fortune or go to jail because he hired the cheapest guy or didn't do due dillagence over the safety policies of the contractors he hires and who is working on his jobs then the best you can hope for is lip service to safety and the occasional sacrificial lamb.

    This is systemic corruption where the laws let certain individuals who benifit from corruption hide behind contracts.

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