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Thread: Metal door jamb

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Default Metal door jamb

    I am remodeling a doctor's office and will have to remove some metal door jambs set in drywalled metal studs, reverse the swing on some and add some.
    Anyplace I can pick up some good tips on working with them?
    daycoconstructioninc.com
    Panama City, FL

    "The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to E. Carrington, 1788

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Metal door jamb

    we had a thread or two about 5 months ago that discussed the different methods of setting and hanging metal knock down buck and solid core doors. i sure a search will bring up lots of results.

    a magnetic level (72" & 30") or a magnetic plumb bob will come in handy.
    insert the screw clips into the back side of both jamb legs about 2" up from the bottom and set one leg first, set the head next making sure to engage the two alignment tabs on the head into the mating slots on the leg, and than the other leg with the clips and tabs.

    center the head in the opening and secure the reverse thread screws that are located about 3" down from the top on each jamb leg that secure the head between the rough opening studs.
    some brands have a tab or a screw hole on the top side of the head casing that also help secure the head to the legs.

    plumb down the legs and also double check the dimension at top and bottom(it must be exactly the same) and screw the clips to the studs. if your hanging multiple doors of the same size make your self a jig out of plywood 6" wide by the inside dimension of the jamb with cutouts for the door stops. once you plumb the first leg use the jig to locate the other leg. it also helps to keep the legs parallel to each other. you can also do a diagonal measurement to double check. hook you tape on the top outside of the casing and measure down to the bottom outside.

    insert the door bumpers into the holes provided.

    use a sheetrock kick to help lift the door (with the hinges already applied, thats another thread all by itself) and hinges into position and screw the top hinge first, the bottom hinge next and than the middle hinge.

    its been a few years since i did any metal bucks so i might be missing something but there are some real good commercial guys here that can give their methods.
    S.M.Titmas.

    "Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you. You just gotta find the ones worth suffering for."
    - Bob Marley

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Metal door jamb

    Are they similar to Timely frames or the standard welded/knockdown hollow metal frames? Either way, installation is a snap.

    Timely (or equivalent) frames have a flange that wraps the rough opening, elongated slots for screwing into the steel stud every 4"-6", are prefinished, and have precut and mitered casings that snaps into place. Hollow metal knockdown frames are much sturdier, have an adjustable pressure plate near the top of each of the jamb legs, and usually a single face screw near the bottom of each jamb leg. Slide the header up and over the rough opening, then each jamb leg as they will interlock with the header. Piece o' cake.

    http://doormartusa.com/

    http://www.timelyframes.com/
    Richie Poor

    See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil, value engineer your unit prices.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Metal door jamb

    Quote Originally Posted by smtitmas View Post

    use a sheetrock kick to help lift the door (with the hinges already applied, thats another thread all by itself) and hinges into position and screw the top hinge first, the bottom hinge next and than the middle hinge.
    Personally, I never liked or allowed the use of a DW kicker. I have witnessed other installers chip door veneer when the kicker slipped. I like to set the door at a 90° angle to the opening on scrap carpet or a thick, clean piece of cardboard. I then tilt the door slightly away from the opening and set the bottom hinge into the appropriate hinge pocket while slowly turning the second-from-the-bottom hinge screw, but not all the way! Just enough to roll the door up and into place while seating and setting the screws in the other two or three hinges.

    Or, I use a Lincliff Door Cart, similar but much simpler, lighter, and cheaper than this:

    http://doorjak.com/dj50.htm
    Richie Poor

    See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil, value engineer your unit prices.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Metal door jamb

    This subject was partially covered just last week in a thread titled "Timley Frame Primer".

    You've got great information so far, I just have a couple of points to make.

    First you have to determine if it's a KD or a welded frame (we don't have timley frames up here so I don't know about them).

    If it's a welded frame the miters are welded solid, if it'd KD the miters are not welded.

    If it's a KD frame the key to removing the frame is to peel back the base and you will find screw tabs that are holding the frames in place.

    If it's a welded frame (most likely for the entrance to an office) you will have to remove the drywall on both sides of the frame and you will find clips behind the drywall holding the frame to the metal studs. You CAN remove a 6" strip of drywall around the door to remove it but you will find that cutting back to another stud and a foot or so above the head is necessary to stiffen the installation when you reinstall the door.

    Before you start if you are reinstalling existing door hardware make sure you can change the hand of the hardware in the field. Not all hardware can be easily changed in the field, and some hardware like door closers come handed from the factory and can't be changed (some are universal mount and can just be flipped over). I would get the make and model number or the hardware and go online and get the instruction sheets before trying to reinstall it. If you can't find any info post a picture and I can likely tell you what's what.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Metal door jamb

    Quote Originally Posted by smtitmas View Post
    we had a thread or two about 5 months ago that discussed the different methods of setting and hanging metal knock down buck and solid core doors. i sure a search will bring up lots of results.

    a magnetic level (72" & 30") or a magnetic plumb bob will come in handy.
    insert the screw clips into the back side of both jamb legs about 2" up from the bottom and set one leg first, set the head next making sure to engage the two alignment tabs on the head into the mating slots on the leg, and than the other leg with the clips and tabs.

    center the head in the opening and secure the reverse thread screws that are located about 3" down from the top on each jamb leg that secure the head between the rough opening studs.
    some brands have a tab or a screw hole on the top side of the head casing that also help secure the head to the legs.

    plumb down the legs and also double check the dimension at top and bottom(it must be exactly the same) and screw the clips to the studs. if your hanging multiple doors of the same size make your self a jig out of plywood 6" wide by the inside dimension of the jamb with cutouts for the door stops. once you plumb the first leg use the jig to locate the other leg. it also helps to keep the legs parallel to each other. you can also do a diagonal measurement to double check. hook you tape on the top outside of the casing and measure down to the bottom outside.

    insert the door bumpers into the holes provided.

    use a sheetrock kick to help lift the door (with the hinges already applied, thats another thread all by itself) and hinges into position and screw the top hinge first, the bottom hinge next and than the middle hinge.

    its been a few years since i did any metal bucks so i might be missing something but there are some real good commercial guys here that can give their methods.
    PERFECT AND COMPLETE ADVICE.
    THE ONLY THING I DO DIFFERENTLY IS PUT THE BUMPERS IN AFTER PAINTING.

    Regards,

    Tom

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Metal door jamb

    Quote Originally Posted by user843839 View Post

    THE ONLY THING I DO DIFFERENTLY IS PUT THE BUMPERS IN AFTER PAINTING.
    Likewise. Painters never, ever remember where they put the door silencers after removing them to paint the frames, IF they remember to remove them first...because liquor's fine but lacquer's quicker.

    Also, you'll probably need to shim level one HM frame leg or the other. Usually not necessary with a Timely frame - just add more screws to the multitude of slots. Some HM frames come with a welded plate at the very bottom that you can simply slide an appropriate number of steel shims or heavy washers under. If your frames don't have the plate, install one of the frame strap anchors at the very bottom of the frame legs, adjust the lowest jamb leg up to level, then drive a small, self-drilling screw through the frame face and into the frame strap, below carpet if possible.
    Richie Poor

    See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil, value engineer your unit prices.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Metal door jamb

    Just FWIW, the elongated slots in a Timely frame are not for screwing the frame to the wall. They are for nailing wood trim over the frame. Timely frames have holes punched in them that are about 1/8'' diam. every foot or so. These are the holes you are supposed to use to screw the jambs in place.
    Mark


    If I had a dollar for every time I heard someone say, "If I had a dollar for every time....", I'd be a rich man.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Metal door jamb

    Quote Originally Posted by markhoni View Post
    Just FWIW, the elongated slots in a Timely frame are not for screwing the frame to the wall. They are for nailing wood trim over the frame. Timely frames have holes punched in them that are about 1/8'' diam. every foot or so. These are the holes you are supposed to use to screw the jambs in place.
    You are correct. I substituted 'slots' for 'holes', and have slapped myself silly for this egregious error. :)
    Richie Poor

    See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil, value engineer your unit prices.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Metal door jamb

    If the jambs are welded at the miters, then they were installed before rock, and usually have six or more special clips that are either welded to the jamb, or slipped into it at installation, with straps that bend around the framing, and are either nailed or screwed to the framing.Then the rock is tucked in behind the flange of the jamb. I had to reverse a couple of these types of jambs in a motel I was trimming a couple months ago, because our framers installed them swinging into the wrong areas. I had to peel the wallpaper back from the jamb, and was able to cut down the sides of the jambs with a fine tooth sawsall blade, cutting the drywall and the straps off as I went on both sides of either the latch side or hinge side of the jamb, across both sides of the top, and then just where the straps were on both sides of the opposite jamb leg (I found these by inserting a thin stainless ruler that I bent in an arc between the jamb and the rock, and then sliding it up or down until I hit the clips.) Then I was able to wiggle the jamb out of the opening, put new clips in it, slide it back in the right way, notch the rock out where I needed to, to bend the straps, bend them over, and re-screw them. I was also able to cover the edges of the rock by shifting the jamb over slightly, and shimming it up a little. Then the drywaller had to do some minor patching and the wallpaperer had to stick his wallpaper back down. It was a PITA, but it turned out just fine. a bead of caulk around the jamb where the wallpaper met it, finished it off very nicely.
    Mark


    If I had a dollar for every time I heard someone say, "If I had a dollar for every time....", I'd be a rich man.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Metal door jamb

    Quote Originally Posted by Overbuilders View Post
    You are correct. I substituted 'slots' for 'holes', and have slapped myself silly for this egregious error. :)
    At least you didn't slap yourself stupid.
    Mark


    If I had a dollar for every time I heard someone say, "If I had a dollar for every time....", I'd be a rich man.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Metal door jamb

    Quote Originally Posted by Overbuilders View Post
    You are correct. I substituted 'slots' for 'holes', and have slapped myself silly for this egregious error. :)
    actually i was hoping that you the kind of guy that prefers "slots" over "holes", and not the other way around.
    S.M.Titmas.

    "Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you. You just gotta find the ones worth suffering for."
    - Bob Marley

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Metal door jamb

    just make sure you find out it the floor is level and if its higher on the jamb side then you will have to shim up the hinge side before you fasten it, i always plumb and fasten the hinge side then hange the door and then fit the latch side of the jamb so your reveal is nice and even down the whole length of the jamb then fasten it.. also make sure of your local fire codes, i know that we have to use welded jambs now because of fire codes..especially if its a dr's office ..
    good luck.

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