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  • trying to stay healthy

    In the past years I have noticed that my strength and endurance has decreased. I have noticed that I can get winded much more than I used to get from going up to a 2nd floor bathroom job with a bag of thinset or a bucket of tools in each hand. I have put on weight and been warned about things like my blood pressure, blood medications I may need to start on, watching my sugar intake. I do not really exercise but am really active in my work as in I do it all. If a piece of crown needs putting up I am probably the guy who climbs the ladder to measure it, climbs down to cut it, climbs back up to install it. If we need to build a deck I am on one end of the 2 x 10 floor joists setting them. I am on my knees setting ceramic tile. So I can and do move most all day long.

    At the same time I do know that is it not a 30 minute sustained workout that may be better for me. I have the aches and pains of someone my age or so I feel. I have always hated it when a doctor asks me how I feel. I want to answer how would you feel after 30 years of swinging a hammer, running drills and impact drivers, carrying materials, holding things overhead or bending over to frame a wall on the floor? But I don't.

    Not really looking for any type of medical advice but more along the lines of what some of you guys are doing to help trying tot stay healthy. I know some of you bikers or hikers, for others it might be diets that have helped, maybe even the testosterone type stuff. So far my medical doctor has not said anything drastic needs to be done but has suggested that I need to be aware of my health a little more than I have been in the past.

  • #2
    I started running and walking again in April and have lost 20 pounds. We try to walk 4 to 5 miles 3 times a week.

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    • #3
      My main strategy for staying healthy, was to pick ancestors with unusually long lifespans and no cancer, diabetics, heart disease etc. Unfortunately, I was remiss in excluding the ones who had arthritis and wore glasses, but its not too too bad...or as my doctor said, "about what I would expect to see for your vintage".
      I drastically cut down my consumption of meat and sugar in the last few years and I lost some weight, sleep more soundly and feel much better all around. BP dropped and cholesterol dropped, as a result. I am just getting back into strenuous exercise, weight lifting and such the last 12 months, since I have more time for that these days. But the previous ten years, I was mostly walking, biking and working, for exercise and I only managed to do that about 8 montsh per year, so I am glad to be able to do more and do it more consistently. I would strongly recommend that you do what I did and stop eating things that taste good.

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      • #4
        I lost 25 lbs. a year ago by walking the steepest hills I could find as fast as my fitness allowed. Barely doable at the beginning. Thought for sure a heart attack was coming because I was so out of shape. I too work like a dog, but found that real exercise is way different.
        My shoulders and ankles are shot from work, and a crash I did coming off a roof.
        Crappy weather days I go to the gym and use the incline tread mill.
        Key is to get the old rate up.

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        • #5
          I work out doing cardio and strength training 10-12 hours a week, plus another 30 minutes or so each day doing stretching and yoga type exercises. Most people think cardio is the most important type of exercise but really strength training is more beneficial

          My cardio is 50 minutes of speed walking and running 5 days a week. I throw in 2 hours of biking couple times a month. I do weight lifting strength training 5-6 days a week, 2 days upper body, 2 days lower body, 1-2 days core. Each upper body workout is 400-500 reps. Lower body workout is 200-300 reps. Strength training you have to be careful with adaptation, doing same exercises month after month. I try to vary routine.

          So at age 66, my blood pressure is normal, cholesteral is 110, resting heart rate is 51, which if you Google that rate it is athelete level. I am 6'-1" weight 178-180. I have a fairly good diet, watch carbs and processed foods, eat lots of fruit, veggies. I do better 5-6 smaller meals a day.

          Having said this you never know when your time is up. I workout because it makes me feel good, I have no aches or pains, never had any illness worse than the flu. I feel blessed with good health. But I know at my age it could change instantly.
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          • #6
            Allan, that is a pretty impressive schedule. I doubt I could do more than about 10% of that.

            This past year with the passing of both my dad and my mother in law I have really let myself get in a bad habit of not watching what I eat or doing any exercise. For several months it was grab whatever you could on the way to the hospital or nursing home at some fast food place. I packed it on and now need to take it off but want to take it off sensibly. Just have noticed how winded I can get with the extra weight so need to start something.

            I used to like to ride my bike but have not had one for years. Never was much of a runner. I know someone else who does some yoga stuff and talks about how much harder it is than you might think. May need to try some of that just for the stretching and work I need to start slow.

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            • #7
              I dislike the gym very much. Cardio in a gym is terribly boring to me. Instead I hike, bike, run, ski but I do weights in my gym.

              My my doctor once told me don't exercise when you can "find" time, "take" the time instead.

              Like Alan said, the way it makes you feel is reward enough. It also gives me a better attitude.
              "First we finish the game, then we’ll deal with the Armada!"

              Sir Frances Drake

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              • #8
                I am a road cyclist and ride 120-140 miles a week. 90% of that riding is done solo at a heartrate of 140bpm (threshold) when my max HR is 153bpm. I started riding again in 2009 and it has totally eliminated my reoccurring sciatic back pane that came to visit every 6 months.

                At age 60 I feel like I'm thirty but I do come home more tired from long, hard days now. I can beat most young guys on the flats but they can usually take me on the hills due to a lack of fast twitch muscle fiber.

                Brian
                Brian

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                • #9
                  Besides work which includes a fair share of ladders, joists, & 3/4" ply
                  I connected a series of game trails on my farm and go a couple miles as hard as I can twice a week. At 60 I'm 10-20 years older than most of my crew, and need less rests, but I think it's more mental. The biggest game changer was an inversion table. No back pain in 15 years. A serious sauna every week, some beer, stress at work but not at home. One thing for sure, I don't heal as fast.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mueller Construction View Post
                    I am a road cyclist and ride 120-140 miles a week. 90% of that riding is done solo at a heartrate of 140bpm (threshold) when my max HR is 153bpm. I started riding again in 2009 and it has totally eliminated my reoccurring sciatic back pane that came to visit every 6 months.

                    At age 60 I feel like I'm thirty but I do come home more tired from long, hard days now. I can beat most young guys on the flats but they can usually take me on the hills due to a lack of fast twitch muscle fiber.

                    Brian
                    At age 60 that is impressive, good for you. What formula do you use to determine your max heart rate, seems there are several opinions on what it should be. Also I assume you use a heart rate monitor? What brand?
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                    • #11
                      At age 60 that is impressive, good for you. What formula do you use to determine your max heart rate, seems there are several opinions on what it should be. Also I assume you use a heart rate monitor? What brand?[/QUOTE]

                      I determined my max heart rate over the years when I compete on hills with other cycling club members. I use a Garmin Edge 500 and basically push myself to the max, just before throwing up. Garmin and Strava, a cycling and running social network site, makes it easy to track your output, riding stats and history.

                      Heart rate is a strange thing. My HR will be 10bpm low if I am not recovered from a previous ride. A second consecutive day of hard riding will make it difficult to reach 140bpm. But when I’m fully recovered, I can hold 140bpm for about 2 hours and 15 minutes. I once held it for 3 hours and it wrecked me.
                      Brian

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