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Paperstone countertop

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  • Paperstone countertop

    Has anybody here installed this material? Looking for feedback please.

    http://www.thenaturalabode.com/green...countertop.htm
    Last edited by tomthetoolman40; 03-12-2012, 01:40 PM. Reason: add link........duh
    Tom

    "Whoever ceases to be a student has never been a student." George Iles

  • #2
    Re: Paperstone countertop

    We've used it several times. We're using Richlite more these days, but it's basically the same thing. It's tough to work, but you can use regular woodworking tools. I think it looks pretty cool - kind of like the synthetic slate of those old lab tables.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Dancing Dan; 03-12-2012, 01:47 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: Paperstone countertop

      I've used it a couple times, and use Richlite regularly too. I found it easy to work with, although it is heavy. Use sharp tools. Hand planes don't work very well.
      http://www.lavrans.com

      "He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp posts; for support rather than illumination." -Andrew Lang

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      • #4
        Re: Paperstone countertop

        How does this stuff hold up in a kitchen setting, including around the sink?

        I've installed it once, in a utility room. Seemed easy to scratch... compared to granite.
        Bailer Hill Construction, Inc. - Friday Harbor, WA
        Website - Facebook

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        • #5
          Re: Paperstone countertop

          Thanks guys. How do you finish the front edge? Is this a solid material, or like plywood with layers?
          Tom

          "Whoever ceases to be a student has never been a student." George Iles

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Paperstone countertop

            Seems to hold up fine. Can chip a little with an undermount - good place for a slightly bigger chamfer than on the edges if you can.

            And Tom - it's sort of like plywood - it's got a top layer you need to take care of.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Paperstone countertop

              What it is: paper saturated with epoxy and compressed. It has some grain. It I fairly impervious to most things, but you really should resell edges around under mount sinks. I think it's better to think of as a marble or slate- it will patina over time; may look a little weird for a little bit, but will get a very cool patina after a time.

              It's not granite or plastic.
              http://www.lavrans.com

              "He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp posts; for support rather than illumination." -Andrew Lang

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              • #8
                Re: Paperstone countertop

                For those who have used it - how does it hold up to UV exposure? I've heard it is subject to fading.
                Thanks,
                Ben

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Paperstone countertop

                  Ben - I kept a piece rolling around in the back of my truck over a winter to see how it would do - didn't seem to lighten enormously.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Paperstone countertop

                    Originally posted by Lavrans View Post
                    What it is: paper saturated with epoxy and compressed. It has some grain. It I fairly impervious to most things, but you really should resell edges around under mount sinks. I think it's better to think of as a marble or slate- it will patina over time; may look a little weird for a little bit, but will get a very cool patina after a time.

                    It's not granite or plastic.
                    As I understand, and was told by our local supplier, the product is comprised of multiple layers of recycled paper bound (compressed) by nut resins thereby making it a green product, not epoxy. Under it's "Paperstone" name, it was manufactured in Washington State, not so green for us in the NE. Richlite (as I have been told), is made by one of the guys from that company but now in PA, a bit better for us up here.

                    It does work like wood and holds up pretty damn well. I made a vessel sink out of some scraps for my office bathroom and have not had an issue in two years. I'll test it for a while longer and then have the market on hippie sinks and charge accordingly!

                    As far as it's use for counter tops, not in my house. I prefer a local product like slate or concrete, or wood where it's appropriate.
                    Portland Renovations, Inc.
                    www.portlandrenovations.com

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                    • #11
                      Re: Paperstone countertop

                      It doesn't do a whole lot, but will fade a little bit.
                      http://www.lavrans.com

                      "He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp posts; for support rather than illumination." -Andrew Lang

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Paperstone countertop

                        Originally posted by Dancing Dan View Post
                        Ben - I kept a piece rolling around in the back of my truck over a winter to see how it would do - didn't seem to lighten enormously.
                        Uh, "kept a piece rolling around in the back of my truck"...as if that was experimentation versus being too lazy to clean out the bed of you truck.
                        Portland Renovations, Inc.
                        www.portlandrenovations.com

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                        • #13
                          Re: Paperstone countertop

                          Originally posted by Dutchman View Post
                          As I understand, and was told by our local supplier, the product is comprised of multiple layers of recycled paper bound (compressed) by nut resins thereby making it a green product, not epoxy. Under it's "Paperstone" name, it was manufactured in Washington State, not so green for us in the NE. Richlite (as I have been told), is made by one of the guys from that company but now in PA, a bit better for us up here.

                          It does work like wood and holds up pretty damn well. I made a vessel sink out of some scraps for my office bathroom and have not had an issue in two years. I'll test it for a while longer and then have the market on hippie sinks and charge accordingly!

                          As far as it's use for counter tops, not in my house. I prefer a local product like slate or concrete, or wood where it's appropriate.
                          Hey- you are correct. It's made with "petro-free resins".
                          http://www.lavrans.com

                          "He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp posts; for support rather than illumination." -Andrew Lang

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Paperstone countertop

                            Seeing as it is a nut resin, what about those with nut allergies? Should they avoid the product?

                            Tom
                            http://chicagocraftsmen.org/2011/06/261.html

                            Check with the AHJ, what we say doesn't matter.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Paperstone countertop

                              I don't think so- it has been certified for use in labs & healthcare facilities. Or... It was.
                              http://www.lavrans.com

                              "He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp posts; for support rather than illumination." -Andrew Lang

                              Comment

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