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Techniques to move heavy appliances

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  • #16
    Re: Techniques to move heavy appliances

    Mark - I think I got it here although it showed up in my records as EJ Welch. It cost me $375, which I see is still the price. It's the only air sled I've ever used so I can't compare it to anything else, but I've been more than pleased with it - I've moved a fully-loaded fridge just guiding it with one hand. The only thing I wish is that you could adjust the air flow a little - sometimes putting a fridge under a wall hung with tight clearance gets a little tricky - have to play the power switch to keep it low enough.

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    • #17
      Re: Techniques to move heavy appliances

      Dan:

      It says maximum capacity is 750 lbs, the 48" SubZero is 885 lbs, wonder if there is a safety margin there enough to lift it, very interesting principle. The 60" Viking range is 762 lbs, I had both the 48" SubZero and the 60" Viking in the last kitchen I did, and we are putting our refrigerators up 4" off the floor into armoires now, this may change with the new see-thru fronts, but so far everyone around here wants to hide the refrigerator.
      You will ask what goal the U.S. is pursuing? .... their external debt is huge, and ruining other countries is their customary method. Even ownership of the global 'printing press' is no longer helping. Nor is full control over NATO, None of that if enough for the 21st century colonizers. They don't just need to preserve the dollar as the only global currency but also to get their hands on the economic wealth of other large powers and regions. - Sergei Naryshkin

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      • #18
        Re: Techniques to move heavy appliances

        Thanks Dan
        Mark Parlee
        BESI(building envelope science institute) Envelope Inspector
        EDI Certified EIFS Inspector/Moisture Analyst/Quality Control/Building Envelope II
        EDI Seminar Instructor
        Level one thermographer (Snell)
        www.thebuildingconsultant.com
        www.parleebuilders.com
        You build to code, code is the minimum to pass this test. Congratulations your grade is a D-

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        • #19
          Re: Techniques to move heavy appliances

          Thank YOU! Mr. Dan. & Bobk

          Exactly what I was hoping for.... a positive experience with a tool that would do the job.

          Mucho appreciatiaooOOO!

          I can't wait to get it and try it on my 30" viking...... Wife will be wondering what I'm doing ..... I'll just tell her I bought it to get the dust bunnies out of the back of the stove..... ;-)
          Chuck

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          • #20
            Re: Techniques to move heavy appliances

            Chuck- It will come in handy when you need to move a big appliance by yourself. It is deceivingly powerful. I have just recently done a couple of kitchens where I moved full refrigerators from the kitchen down the hall and around to the dining room with no problem.

            Dick- If that SubZero is 885 without food in it, It must be 1100 with food. Resting on 4 small feet in 8sf. That better be bolted to the wall like it is supposed to be. With the doors and drawers open watch out.

            I think there is a direct correlation between the size of the appliances and the use of them. The larger the range the less they cook, it's all show. Especially for SubZero and Viking both have poor repair histories and cost $$$ to repair. The viking will need an igniter ($200+) in a year.

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            • #21
              Re: Techniques to move heavy appliances

              Originally posted by bobkni View Post
              Chuck- It will come in handy when you need to move a big appliance by yourself. It is deceivingly powerful. I have just recently done a couple of kitchens where I moved full refrigerators from the kitchen down the hall and around to the dining room with no problem.

              I think there is a direct correlation between the size of the appliances and the use of them. The larger the range the less they cook, it's all show. Especially for SubZero and Viking both have poor repair histories and cost $$$ to repair. The viking will need an igniter ($200+) in a year.
              VIking!!!!! Don't get me started.

              Viking sent their repair people 4 times to my house to fix a burner which wouldn't ignite on the stove top.

              first changed the igniter tip. Next guy changed the burner itself, next one changed the computer, next guy changed the computer again and told me that I needed a new valve which regulated the gas flow to the burner...


              Bunch of F-in idiots. I called the company about 6 times, wrote them nasty letters, sent them nasty emails.....no one could fix it and they kept denying that there was a problem with the design.

              Finally after 2 years and hours of lighting the burner with a match, I called a local appliance guy here. He came out, looked at it, said ....."no problem".

              He unscrewed the igniter / ceramic stem that sits next to the burner and bent the two tabs on the igniter so that the gap was decreased between the burner and igniter.....similar to a spark plug being gapped in a gasoline engine.


              DONE!!!!! haven't had one incident since.

              IMO........DON"T BUY a Viking product. What a waste of money and the customer service is worthless.

              It's not the first time / last time I've heard this same scenario.
              Chuck

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              • #22
                Re: Techniques to move heavy appliances

                I use heavy duty furniture dollies or "moving disks" I picked up at a yard sale a few years ago. The disks are 6" and made from a teflon like material on one side, so items will slide pretty easily along the floor. Only downside is of the disks pick up dirt, they could scratch the floor.

                OPD
                Renaissance Restorations LLC
                www.renaissancerestorations.com

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                • #23
                  Re: Techniques to move heavy appliances

                  I don't know if this will be relevant to your needs, but I had to be creative on a flat roof one time.

                  The GC hired a new PM for a BK being built in Frankfort, IL. The PM was from Oklahoma and felt that all Chicago contractors must have paid off the previous PM to acquire the job because the prices were higher than he had ever dealt with from his neck of the woods.

                  To "Screw" with our roofing performance, he intentionally had the roof top HVAC units placed on the curbs before we were scheduled to start.

                  We could not run our single ply membrane to the nailer with the lower rails in the way.

                  Well, I figured if the Egyptians could move pyramid blocks, I could move several HVAC units too.

                  I used a pair of crank handle air conditioning jacks, inserted 12" sections of 5" or 6" pvc pipe under the unit, layed a 2" x 12" on top of the sections of pvc, and then lowered the HVAC units onto the boards. They rolled seamlessly from one side of the roof to the other in a matter of minutes. After moving the unit about a foot at a time, we had to take the rear section of pvc pipe and move it to the front of each 2" x 12" board to continue forward.

                  Since I already had the 2" isocyanurate insulation fastened down and the single ply membrane already secured to the entire field are, we just moved them to a double joisted area and set them down on sleepers.

                  He couldn't figure out how we got those units out of our way to properly flash the curbs, and turned out to be a decent guy, considering the poor first experience with him.

                  Until he changed his tune on that job, I told him I was just going to leave the units where they sat and that he would have to hire a crane to reset them again.

                  Ed
                  Stay tuned for a very important message from our sponsor.
                  http://www.rightwayroofingcompany.com/
                  www.RightWayRoofingCompany.com

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                  • #24
                    Re: Techniques to move heavy appliances

                    The Robert's unit sounds like the ticket. Anyone have a photo of it in action? The website doesn't show much. Thanks.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Techniques to move heavy appliances

                      I don't have photos, but it far exceeded my expectations.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Techniques to move heavy appliances

                        My submission for an appliance mover is the ‘Broom-Dolly’

                        Last time I move a refrigerator I used a broom as a dolly. A thick heavy-duty broom with a fat handle works best as it provides better clearance of the adjusters off the floor.

                        Tilt the reffer away from you and slide the broom under it. Push the reffer back the other way so that the bristles near the reinforced area of the broom head support the edge of the appliance. It takes two people, one pushes and the other pulls the broom and supports/controls the appliance with his free hand. Works like a charm on carpet, linoleum, wood, everything I’ve tried it on so for, but you need to keep the unit from wobbling and allowing the adjusters from scarring the floor. A really thick broom is best. You can also slide a piece of carpet under the unit first and then place the broom under that to help protect the floor from the adjusters during a wobble.
                        One Length Method© by Richard Birch

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