Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Drilling into a conference table.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Drilling into a conference table.

    Normally I would not worry about drilling a few holes but this is a rather expensive veneered table. I am looking for recommendations as to which drill bits ( one inch holes) to use as well as any best practice advice. The holes are for microphones in a large conference table. The microphones have less than a 1/8" lip on which they cover the table. Hence the need for precise clean cuts.
    Thanks,
    Dan

  • #2
    Re: Drilling into a conference table.

    Forstner mounted in a decent drill guide/press.
    “I find the curiosity of our men with respect to this animal is pretty much satisfied.”
    ~ Meriwether Lewis

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Drilling into a conference table.

      Plunge router clamped to the table, new 1" bit. Plunge through the veneer slowly.

      Tom
      http://chicagocraftsmen.org/2011/06/261.html

      Check with the AHJ, what we say doesn't matter.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Drilling into a conference table.

        Use a sharp forstner with a clamped guide. It won't slip and the guide will prevent tear out. too
        there is ALWAYS a better way waiting to be discovered-
        yfc

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Drilling into a conference table.

          +1 on the plunge router, but you could just go forstner/handheld and pull it off, if you have the nerve.
          Bailer Hill Construction, Inc. - Friday Harbor, WA
          Website - Facebook

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Drilling into a conference table.

            Originally posted by David Meiland View Post
            +1 on the plunge router, but you could just go forstner/handheld and pull it off, it you have the nerve.
            That's the problem -I don't think I have the nerve. Thanks for the replys.
            Dan

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Drilling into a conference table.

              You may want to tape it both top and bottom and go very slowly with a new/sharp bit.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Drilling into a conference table.

                The idea of the clamped guide is a good one also. I would bore through a 2x with the same bit I would use on the table. Clamp it down well, bore away. Low speed on the drill.

                It is just a job, nothing to be nervous about. I bet you have bored holes before.

                My first choice is still the router.

                Tom
                Last edited by tjbnwi; 04-30-2012, 09:20 PM.
                http://chicagocraftsmen.org/2011/06/261.html

                Check with the AHJ, what we say doesn't matter.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Drilling into a conference table.

                  A bit and brace. You will have the most control as you can turn the brace as slowly and carefully as you desire, if there is any problem you can stop before any tearout.
                  If you bat 1000 you're playing in the minor leagues.

                  Warren Buffet

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Drilling into a conference table.

                    Kieth,

                    How well does a brace and bit work in/on particle board? I'm not sure if it is the core, but the ones I have looked at and refinished have been veneer over particle board. It could be MDF also.

                    Tom
                    http://chicagocraftsmen.org/2011/06/261.html

                    Check with the AHJ, what we say doesn't matter.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Drilling into a conference table.

                      Tom,

                      Bit & brace does not work particularly well in either but then neither does any other type of bit. It will rely on downward pressure since the lead screw which helps pull the cutter through the material will not get good purchase. A good quality double twist bit will have 2 scoring spurs and 2 cutting blades as opposed to the Irwin style which only have one. The important feature is to have the scoring spurs sharp so that they cut the veneer before the cut is made. This is not a particularly fast way to bore holes and I would probably use a forsner bit myself but if you are concerned about damaging the table a bit & brace will give the most control.
                      If you bat 1000 you're playing in the minor leagues.

                      Warren Buffet

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Drilling into a conference table.

                        Thanks Keith.

                        Tom
                        http://chicagocraftsmen.org/2011/06/261.html

                        Check with the AHJ, what we say doesn't matter.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Drilling into a conference table.

                          No question I'd go with the forstner bit - they are easy to keep upright so I wouldn't worry about clamping a guide or anything like that - just go slow until you get the feel for it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Drilling into a conference table.

                            I am assuming that all of the holes will be the same distance from the table. If that is so, why not make a t-square type " sled" with your 1" hole drilled at the proper distance from the edge. You line up the centerline, clamp it down and drill with your drill and a sharp, quality Forster.

                            John

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Drilling into a conference table.

                              Seeing how you have only an 1/8" of coverage which pretty much means a slip up or bit catch throws the veneer off the sheet goods and past the trim coverage, maybe tackle it in two steps with first making a fault catch. I'd go with a pilot hole to lessen the concern for start up troubles, hand turn a 1 1/16" bit through the top sheet of veneer and then the 1" is free to cut through the table with much less chances of knocking into the surrounding area. This sounds the same as someone asking to put a soap dispenser into a new laminate kitchen counter.
                              Last edited by StephenS; 05-01-2012, 03:52 AM.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X