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Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

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  • Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

    I have a client who uses split jambs most of the time. I rarely use them and infact havn't used them in years. What's the advantage over solid jambs beyond helping with wonky walls? Are they easier to set and shim. I mean, I should know these answers but I don't, and I guess... I broke in on solids and just kept using them.

    Gary K did you cover splits in your Book? I'd like some input from the door guru...yes I'm talk'en bout you.
    ~Kent~

  • #2
    Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

    I just used split jambs for the first time on my basement renovation, and I like them. They go in faster than standard jambs, and they help with walls that might be a little off on thickness. You've still got to get something solid behind the hinges if you want them to feel "solid" when you close them, but even a guy like me who doesn't hang doors every day got to the point of only taking around 15 minutes/door, and that's fully cased when it's done.

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    • #3
      Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

      OK so what are BOTH these types of Jambs?

      I'm assuming they are called something different here in CA otherwise I am not familer with either one! LOL ;)
      Jesse Wright
      www.archmolding.net
      www.jessewrightdesign.com
      http://www.facebook.com/pages/Archit...27731683955342

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      • #4
        Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

        When I used to trim regularly, I had my time to install pre-hung, split jamb, "Colonist" doors down to 10minutes/door. That was after I was all set up, doors unpacked and placed next to their locations.

        I've set lots of both types, and I like split jambs better. They're faster for a few reasons.

        Just to be clear, I'm comparing pre-cased flat jambs to the split jambs.

        Those flat jamb doors come with one side pre-cased, and the other casing tacked to the casing that is already applied. So right off the bat, when you pull the tacked casings off the door, they aren't too stable, and the miters can loosen up pretty easily.

        Casings are glued and stapled to the jambs at the factory, so on flat jambs, only the pre-applied side is glued, so obviously you'll have to glue the other side if you want them both glued. So that adds more time.

        Shimming: Easier on split jambs because I slide 2 shims pointed toward each other behind the jamb, VERTICALLY. So no need to cut them. On a flat jamb they need to be cut to length so they'll be the correct thickness at the point where you need them to be behind the hinge.

        However, if the framing is nice and plumb, then this isn't really an issue, since I just slam the hinge side tight, and only shim the strike side. But then again, you gotta get that shim back behind the strike, which imo is harder to do when the jamb is wider.

        And of course the main reason (probably the reason they were invented in the first place) is it really slows you down when hanging a flat jamb on framing that's too wide.

        Tom
        1) Unconsciously Incompetent: He knows not, and knows not that he knows not. He is a fool. Shun him.
        2) Consciously Incompetent: He knows not, and knows that he knows not. He is simple. Teach him.
        3) Unconsciously Competent: He knows, and knows not that he knows. He is asleep. Wake him.
        4) Consciously Competent: He knows, and knows that he knows. He is wise. Follow him.

        May we all endeavor to progress from not knowing that we know not, to knowing that we know.

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        • #5
          Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

          Originally posted by archmolding View Post
          OK so what are BOTH these types of Jambs?

          I'm assuming they are called something different here in CA otherwise I am not familer with either one! LOL ;)
          They are pre-hung, pre-cased, interior doors.

          Flat jambs have a standard jamb, 4 9/16" wide, with a separate door stop attached, usually stapled, and the hinge side of the jamb is the pre-cased side. Casing is stapled and glued, and has corrugated fasteners at the miters. Another casing set is tacked to the applied casing, with the profiles facing each other.

          A split jamb is a 2 piece jamb. The door stop is part of the jamb, and is incorporated into the hinge side. So the hinge side has a slot that receives the other half of the jamb. You install the first jamb half, then slip the other half into the slot. Both halves have casing already applied.

          Tom
          1) Unconsciously Incompetent: He knows not, and knows not that he knows not. He is a fool. Shun him.
          2) Consciously Incompetent: He knows not, and knows that he knows not. He is simple. Teach him.
          3) Unconsciously Competent: He knows, and knows not that he knows. He is asleep. Wake him.
          4) Consciously Competent: He knows, and knows that he knows. He is wise. Follow him.

          May we all endeavor to progress from not knowing that we know not, to knowing that we know.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

            Originally posted by Jessie
            I'm assuming they are called something different here in CA otherwise I am not familer with either one! LOL ;)
            Jessie:

            In my 60 years in this business the only "split jambs" I've ever seen are hollow metal jambs, so don't go looking for them in wood.
            You will ask what goal the U.S. is pursuing? .... their external debt is huge, and ruining other countries is their customary method. Even ownership of the global 'printing press' is no longer helping. Nor is full control over NATO, None of that if enough for the 21st century colonizers. They don't just need to preserve the dollar as the only global currency but also to get their hands on the economic wealth of other large powers and regions. - Sergei Naryshkin

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            • #7
              Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

              Been using split jambs for 20 plus years, only way to go for production trim.

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              • #8
                Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

                Originally posted by Andrew R. View Post
                Been using split jambs for 20 plus years, only way to go for production trim.
                25 yrs for me, and I agree completely on production trim. Only thing that can trick you is if you get a badly warped/bowed door and don't catch it (it's possible, just trust me :)
                "I'll bend over backwards to help anybody, but I ain't bending over forwards for nobody"

                Paul

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                • #9
                  Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

                  I like to shim at the very bottom of each leg- the carpet guys use their kickers against them and throw off reveals.
                  If you do what you always did, you are going to get what you always got.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

                    WOW OK Pre cased doors? that takes all the fun out of it...I have never seen those ever. I may have heard of them...but They don't even use those in the tracts out here...

                    The only thing we will do in order to speed up the install is order all the mitered casing Pre cut from the door company. But even then we mostly do classical build ups on our doors plinth blocks, casing, & entablatures.

                    I dont even think my suppliers can get these type of doors...I wouldnt want to put them in anyways, as I enjoy casing work.
                    Jesse Wright
                    www.archmolding.net
                    www.jessewrightdesign.com
                    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Archit...27731683955342

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

                      Jesse:

                      While I've never seen "split jambs" in our area, there was a time in the 60s that some door pre-hangers were installing metal clips behind the jambs to nail to the trimmers so you didn't have to use shims. Along with those clips they pre-assembled the casing for both sides with cardboard at the corners and spreaders at the bottom. That went away by the early 70s. I liked the metal clips, but shimmed at the butts anyway, they were fast to hang but too much play at the butts.
                      You will ask what goal the U.S. is pursuing? .... their external debt is huge, and ruining other countries is their customary method. Even ownership of the global 'printing press' is no longer helping. Nor is full control over NATO, None of that if enough for the 21st century colonizers. They don't just need to preserve the dollar as the only global currency but also to get their hands on the economic wealth of other large powers and regions. - Sergei Naryshkin

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

                        I have set and cased lots of doors over the years as a trim carpenter and only a few split jambs. I prefer to hang the door, cut my own casing and case it separately, its the only way to get a good tight miter that will stay tight.
                        -Dan

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                        • #13
                          Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

                          Originally posted by archmolding View Post
                          WOW OK Pre cased doors? that takes all the fun out of it...I have never seen those ever. I may have heard of them...but They don't even use those in the tracts out here...

                          The only thing we will do in order to speed up the install is order all the mitered casing Pre cut from the door company. But even then we mostly do classical build ups on our doors plinth blocks, casing, & entablatures.

                          I dont even think my suppliers can get these type of doors...I wouldnt want to put them in anyways, as I enjoy casing work.
                          Jesse, the builder gets his splits with out casing. He buys a wide mdf profile so we would use clams and hang the casing on site. So hey don't knock it until you try it. After they are hung you can't tell the difference.

                          After all, aren't you the guy who nails his crown into drywall? In the "Burgh" we call the hit'en air and it doesn't fly round here.
                          ~Kent~

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                          • #14
                            Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

                            I would say that over 80% of the doors we hang are split-jamb.... I order them with whatever casing happens to be specified for the project and with whatever jamb width I need.
                            With the prices most builders around here pay, they are a must. I guess we are all products of our environment... most of the work here is production type trim... been paying the bills for years.
                            Roger
                            http://www.mitrecontracting.com
                            TOLERANCE is the virtue of a man without convictions
                            -G.K. Chesterton

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                            • #15
                              Re: Solid Door Jambs vs. Split Jambs?

                              Kent,

                              Whats the point of getting splits if they dont have the casing?? seems like alot more work..as you still have to put casing on. Is that not the reason for getting split Jambs?

                              If the stop covers the seam I could see the adjustabilty you could have for all the drywall variations. That could be really cool.

                              I'm not knocking the product, I don't know anything about it. I would try them if they were ever supplied. Like a lot of these "make it easy" products always have their place. it seems that these doors are used a lot in Production trim work or in the tracts..and that is just not what I do. Also it seems that they are just used more back east...

                              http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-...148144,00.html

                              Interesting concept...Reminds me of Split columns. Always a pain dealing with that seam.

                              Oh far as the crown in the drywall..well I think we already got into that on another thread. Glad you still remember that trick!
                              Last edited by archmolding; 08-27-2010, 01:20 AM.
                              Jesse Wright
                              www.archmolding.net
                              www.jessewrightdesign.com
                              http://www.facebook.com/pages/Archit...27731683955342

                              Comment

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