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Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

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  • Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

    For the last number of years, I have been using Gorilla glue for exterior work, obviously because it's waterproof. But the foaming has always been a mess, and tonight I'm sitting here looking at my hands stained black yet again.

    Now that Titebond III is available, I'm wondering if there is really any advantage to Gorilla glue, and whether I should just be using Titebond. What do you think?

    I always figured the foaming of GG would help seal any gaps, and I had no doubts about the waterproof-ness of it vs. a product like Titebond III which cleans up with water. Have there been any tests done to compare the two? Any personal opinions, thoughts, or experiences you care to share?
    "If you only have a hammer, all problems look like nails"

    Vintage wood window repair and restoration in Chicago
    Wood storm windows in Chicago
    Weatherizing vintage buildings in Chicago

  • #2
    Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

    Just opinion. I dont do a ton of exterior stuff by any means but I cant stand GG. Like you said, just so dang messy. And the things I have glued with T III havent come undone, which is pretty good considering the temp and weather swings we get here. Should I say *yet*?
    As an experiment, I built a Lutyens style bench out of cedar about 4 years ago and put that all together with M&T joinery and West Systems epoxy. I didnt know if that would hold or not, but so far, so good.
    Real trucks run on compression

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    • #3
      Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

      I can tell you one thing--Tite III does not work with cedar. I glued up a bunch of deck post wraps with it and they started breaking apart right away, so I cleaned them up and reglued with GG. I keep a box of disposable gloves on the job at all times and use them whenever I deal with primer, caulk, glue, foam, solvents, etc. If you're going to use Tite III then I would call their tech department and ask them to give you all the parameters, since their website isn't worth jack in that regard.
      Bailer Hill Construction, Inc. - Friday Harbor, WA
      Website - Facebook

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      • #4
        Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

        maybe the cedar sucked up the glue and the joint was dry .cedar can be porous . i have been brushing the glue on both sides giving it some time and reapplying .it has been working very well . i have several redwood projects outside for over a year . I use tightbond III outside pretty much always . I picked up using glue brushes from someone on this forum not to long ago and that has really improved my glueups ,previous to that was Jims miterclamp article where i learned about having a toothbrush and water near to cleanup the squeeze out . have been wanting to say thanks for that also. Joseph

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        • #5
          Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

          I've been satisfied with titebond II and wondering what is the benefit of III.
          Gorilla glue always dries out in my tool box and I wind up tossing out half bottles. I was using it for exterior joints for the same reason as Hdrider but its a pain and I think its all hype. I dont buy it anymore.
          Tom

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          • #6
            Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

            We've had goodluck with TB3, you do have to be careful not to have starved joints, porous wood and plywood edges need to be sized. You also need to use some kind of a brush to spread it out evenly. We keep flux brushes and chip brushes on hand for glue, as well as deli-cups to put the glue in. Usually, it helps to shorten the bristles, gives a stiffer brush. Gorilla has its place, but we use TB3 when ever we can.

            Also, I wouldn't depend on GG to fill gaps, if your joints don't fit together well, they won't be very strong. We make up test samples and leave them outside the shop in the weather and watch what happens to them. We made a roof ballustrade that had hundreds of tandem M &T joints using loose tenons. Because of the long open time, and slippery nature of GG it is perfect for this type of assembly. Before starting glue-up we made a series of test joints to check our tolerances and see how things would go. The test joints we made loosely blew apart quite easily under stress-testing. The more carefully fitted joints broke out the mortise cheeks before failure.
            Mike
            www.thehousewrightllc.com

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            • #7
              Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

              After my experience with TB3 I called and talked to one of their chemists. He said that cedar was no-go unless it was below 10% MC and remained there. I did not ask about redwood but there are obvious similarities, so I would check on that if I were using that glue.
              Bailer Hill Construction, Inc. - Friday Harbor, WA
              Website - Facebook

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              • #8
                Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

                One place that I have had the best luck with GG is in regluing loose chairs. Very little reprep required and it hols tight. Other than that I only use GG in areas where it will never show and TII or TIII everywhere else.
                Brad

                You will never stand taller than when kneeling to help a child.

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                • #9
                  Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

                  I do not have any experience with Gorilla Glue, but Titebond III is a great glue. Strong and very easy to clean up.

                  Am I the only one who do not use a glue brush? Never heard of it, always used my finger to spread out the glue like Gary does:)

                  Perhaps I need to check it out.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

                    Funny, I think each glue has it's place.

                    I use GG all the time with pressure treated. I think it works great and most pressure treated projects are not destroyed by a little foamy squeeze out.

                    I use TB when doing trim and nicer work.

                    And I use Azek glue on Azek trim. I haven't had great luck with TB and Azek type trim. GG would just make a mess...

                    Although GG can really make your hands black (and stay that way for quite some time) I really love it for certain uses. The foaming action can even be used as an advantage in some situations.
                    ----
                    John F. Freund
                    Partner
                    JMR Home Improvement, LLC
                    (http://www.JMRHI.com)

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                    • #11
                      Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

                      I use tb3 on exterior applications not directly exposed to rain, and west system on exterior applications exposed to directy rain. The west system is so incredibly strong, even when joints are loose it fills them in and is stronger than the wood.

                      It is a bit of a pain transporting and keeping the cans upright and from not spilling with the pump dispensers. Also the epoxy gets broken down fairly quickly from UV so it must be either painted, varnished or coated with some UV protected coating if the epoxy will be exposed to the sun.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

                        sitting eating lunch in front of some beautiful box columns i built several years ago . tried to copy the method discribed on Gary's sight regarding ext columns .i used drawer lock glue joint on the edges .not sure how to describe it ,you can buy router bits to make the joint though i used a tablesaw .http://librawood.safeshopper.com/132/cat132.htm?415 . anyhow tightbond 3 .it's slower set time[then tb2] was vauable with such a project .300 $ clear cedar .
                        david isn't any wood with over 10% moisture getting into joint falure .
                        someone step in on this ,what am i nissing here?

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                        • #13
                          Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

                          I typically use Gorilla Glue or its equivalent on any end grain-to-end grain joint. Gorilla Glue is easy to over-apply. I like to spread it with a glue stick, and when I can, I try to wear disposable gloves. And, just like with any expanding glue, you have to secure the joint.

                          Titebond III, is great for everything else... easy to work with, easy to clean.

                          The West System is more trouble than it's worth unless you need it's structural characteristics, i.e. bent laminations.

                          I think that the biggest problem I have with Gorilla Glue is convincing the guys that the joint still needs to fit tight, and to not rely on the foam.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

                            Originally posted by RWeber View Post
                            M&T joinery and West Systems epoxy.
                            I don't think that will ever come apart:)

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                            • #15
                              Re: Titebond III vs. Gorilla Glue

                              Axis 29,
                              I assume that you are using Gorilla Glue on the new ACQ pressure treated wood. Is that correct? I know that it works well on the old CCA treated wood.

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