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The infamous "stacked" fireplace

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  • The infamous "stacked" fireplace

    Really sticks to classical details here.....

    http://www.buildersdesign.com/portfo.../model0002.jpg
    Started laughing out loud when I saw that stupid fireplace. Who the hell specs these homes by STACKING fireplaces? For gods sake, at least design an appropriate fireplace.

    Not as bad as the one a couple weeks ago in that other post with the triple stacked.

    -J
    -----------------------------------------------------
    "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." -Albert Einstein
    Cluelessness: There are no stupid questions, but there are a LOT of inquisitive idiots.

  • #2
    Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

    I like an overmantel in the right situation. I did one recently that I thought looked nice. The proportion seems wrong in the one you posted.
    "We do not see things as they are; we see things as we are" -Talmud

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    • #3
      Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

      And those bright red walls remind me of "The Shining."

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      • #4
        Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

        You know, without the trim upgrade to wrap the cathedral in crown, that space seems kinda empty.

        So which one does Santa come out of?

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        • #5
          Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

          I really like the two fake windows at the top. I don't see where they left room fot the velvet Elvis painting.
          I call this style period "Early Trailer".
          daycoconstructioninc.com
          Panama City, FL

          "The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to E. Carrington, 1788

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          • #6
            Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

            I don't judge what they want. I just do what someone is paying me to do (usually).
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

              a flat screen tv would look good in that spot

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              • #8
                Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                Oh I'll judge. I'll just keep my mouth shut.

                I'm going to cry if a customer ever asks me to put a mantel on top of another. However, if they ask for a tall mantel... I'll design one or spec one that isn't so stupid looking and maybe follows some of the damn rules.

                I don't think anyones gonna change my thinking on how wrong those fireplaces are.

                -J
                -----------------------------------------------------
                "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." -Albert Einstein
                Cluelessness: There are no stupid questions, but there are a LOT of inquisitive idiots.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                  I agree J.

                  Again...customer is always right, unless they are wrong.

                  What's the scribe look like against that brick?

                  Cheers, Wm.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                    I don't know what's worse, that or the baseboard in a $1.1 million dollar tract house I was in yesterday. The tract house was built in '96 and had 3¼" casing run as baseboard.
                    You will ask what goal the U.S. is pursuing? .... their external debt is huge, and ruining other countries is their customary method. Even ownership of the global 'printing press' is no longer helping. Nor is full control over NATO, None of that if enough for the 21st century colonizers. They don't just need to preserve the dollar as the only global currency but also to get their hands on the economic wealth of other large powers and regions. - Sergei Naryshkin

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                    • #11
                      Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                      Sometimes learning how to do something well takes a lot of time--studying or practicing or a combination of both. Kind of like playing a musical instrument. Some people are naturals and get it immediately. Most of us struggle. I think most architects, designers, and carpenters struggle. Few of us are Frank Lloyd Wright. I think when we're young or new to the craft, rather than creating astounding and unique designs, we design and build stuff that later in life we'd rather forget about. I remember the first mantelpieces I built. Fortunately the client thought the whole process could be just as creative and whimsical as I did. And fortunately, I wasn’t taking pictures of my work back then. I remember supporting one mantelshelf with a cornice that was built up from at least a dozen moldings—few of them taller than 1 1/2 in. (I didn’t know how to cut crown then!). The client loved it. I did, too!

                      Mantels with overmantels were common in Palladian homes, which includes the Georgian style popular in America before the revolution, for large plantation owners in the south and for ship owners along the eastern coast. It isn’t ironic that the style has become popular again today. These days, most people think the word Palladian just means big. And it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the extreme wealthy do a fine job of recreating that style—with open pediments, scrolled pediments, stacked pilasters (first Doric then Corinthian or Composite), elaborate carvings, etc.. But trickling down the economic ladder those classical designs begin to lose their authenticity and when they do…. Well, this is the result.

                      The good thing is, well-educated carpenters (not necessary by books but by ‘time’) recognize what is right and what is wrong, (that’s one reason I love visiting historic homes). Many of us may not be able to explain why something is right or something is wrong, but we know it—the same way a practiced musician may not know how to read music. But just because we know it doesn’t make us better than someone else. After Einstein, “better” doesn’t exist: At one time, except for Frank Lloyd Wright, we were all learning the hard way. Whoever designed that mantelpiece (and the ones in the previous post), is still learning about mantelpiece design the hard way. I just hope they figure it out before they build too many more mantels.
                      Gary

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                      • #12
                        Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                        Great post/insight Gary.

                        Well I will be photographing my 'stacked' mantel project this morning. ;-)

                        Cheers, Wm.

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                        • #13
                          Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                          WM,
                          If you do, PLEASE send me a jpeg, not too low a res. I've been trying to find a good one for my powerpoint presentation. We all learn some of the best lessons in life the hard way--oh well, face it, it's true. I'm trying to incorporate what NOT to do in my seminars. And this DOUBLE mantelpiece thing is so perfect because nearly everyone recongizes that something's wrong with this picture but they can't put their finger on it. Learning WHY really helps you learn WHAT for the future. So please send me a pic. I've asked a couple other guys the same thing. If anyone is embarrassed about designing stuff like this, or whatever, get over it or you'll never appreciate the lesson learned.

                          Gary

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                          • #14
                            Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                            Gary:

                            Good point about not taking pictures of our early work, when I think back about some of the things I did I have to think that the customers must have liked me to accept them.

                            All of the overmantles I've seen have been in Victorian homes, and they've never been a reproduction of the mantle, but have been a way to frame a mirror over the mantle. I have never seen anything but a mirror in them, has anyone else seen them used to surround a painting?

                            An overmantle is never a reproduction of the mantle, I think that's what you can't put your finger on. San Francisco Victoriana
                            Last edited by Dick Seibert; 12-27-2005, 12:00 PM.
                            You will ask what goal the U.S. is pursuing? .... their external debt is huge, and ruining other countries is their customary method. Even ownership of the global 'printing press' is no longer helping. Nor is full control over NATO, None of that if enough for the 21st century colonizers. They don't just need to preserve the dollar as the only global currency but also to get their hands on the economic wealth of other large powers and regions. - Sergei Naryshkin

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                              I've done many over mantles and the key is what Dick said, " An over mantle is never a reproduction of the mantle".
                              Mine were always smaller, with less depth and were meant to encase/highlight a mirror or painting. Most of mine contained a field of thin plywood that was painted the same color as the wall in order to get a different texture. I will try to find a picture.
                              daycoconstructioninc.com
                              Panama City, FL

                              "The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to E. Carrington, 1788

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