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The infamous "stacked" fireplace

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  • #76
    Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

    One thing to remember is that the Greeks more or less started it all, the Romans added arches and more, it
    got reimagined again in the Renaissance and the
    first (or was that 21st? :-) ) Classical Revival and
    then we have the 19th century where every style yet
    know was tossed around again. The 1898 fair
    and Dan Burnham set the next big time it was
    revived and that lasted really until the second
    war...look at Washington DC.
    So you are never going to have to worry too much
    about what is "correct". Instead it is pretty much
    what is balanced and pleasing to the eye.
    Hey, when I first saw the little details you were
    attaching with the screws I thought they looked
    rather Egyptian. Yes, we had that revival too!
    Very nice thread and a lot of food for thought.

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    • #77
      Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

      Don,
      Dick's absolutely right about how the code has influenced mantelpiece designs. Where I live, there are counties that require a 12 in. clearance on the side of the firebox, too, where stretches the design like a rubberband. The 12 in. clearance from the top also adds height, so most mantelshelves are nearly five feet off the floor, when they once were closer to four feet. And lots of folks want a raised hearth, too, where they can sit by the fireplace, and they still want pilasters, so you end up sticking a mantel onto of the heart, raising it another sixteen to eighteen inches in the air. That's really silly. I agree with you, too, about proportions. Since the mantels are taller and wider, the pilasters have to be wider, and the entablature taller. Ironic and sad, in some ways, but change isn't something you can always fight, especially if it's a building code.

      Gary

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      • #78
        Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

        Gary:

        Those clearances are rigorously enforced by the inspectors around here. On many occasions I've had them measure them. The workaround is to use tin-can fireplaces, the code defaults to the manufacturers' instructions, so if a guy wants to play that game he should review the installation instructions before buying the fireplace.
        You will ask what goal the U.S. is pursuing? .... their external debt is huge, and ruining other countries is their customary method. Even ownership of the global 'printing press' is no longer helping. Nor is full control over NATO, None of that if enough for the 21st century colonizers. They don't just need to preserve the dollar as the only global currency but also to get their hands on the economic wealth of other large powers and regions. - Sergei Naryshkin

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        • #79
          Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

          You're absolutely right! I was designing a mantel for a friend and told him he couldn't do what he wanted, then his builder emailed me the instructions from the prefab unit and sure as heck, we were able to put that mantelpiece RIGHT where we wanted it. Glass doors, o-clearance, gas-appliance (not a real fireplace) etc. Not a BAD way to go at all if you're concerned about proportions.

          Gary

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          • #80
            Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

            Very good points about the code's impact on design. I hadn't thought of that angle. Only a few towns in Wyoming have adopted building codes, other than septic inspections (usually county run) or electrical, which is enforced by the state. Here in Boise, I have yet to work with a real fireplace since inserts are so popular.

            Also, it's hard when the the tin can gas insert is set up higher than normal. Worse yet is when an insert is used as a room divider. Has anyone built a mantle over a three sided gas insert? I've never come across a picture of that.

            Cheers,
            Don

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            • #81
              Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

              Originally posted by Don_in_Idaho
              Has anyone built a mantle over a three sided gas insert? I've never come across a picture of that.

              I've done a double (master suite bedroom/sitting room), and the mantels were connected around the wall with wainscot to match. No picture unfortunately, they were oiled/waxed cherry, similar in design to the mahogany piece I recently posted, sans the carvings/overmantel.

              Cheers, Wm.

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              • #82
                Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                Don,

                Here's one I did for a builder friend's spec home. Natural maple, tried to stay simple. Wraps around the third side. Made it a "u" shaped all in one piece w/ a "u" shaped channel. Put the backing on the wall and slid it over it and attached it...James

                http://www.snowscustomcabinetry.com/images/DSCF0072.JPG

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                • #83
                  Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                  Check the height of this one.
                  Attached Files
                  Dave
                  NB Custom Renovations
                  __________________

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                  • #84
                    Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                    Not sure what those two little things next to the fireplace are? Most be a big t.v. they want above.
                    "I told you I was sick"

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                    • #85
                      Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                      maybee now it will be famous! the matching pair
                      Attached Files
                      Kreg
                      www.builtinking.com
                      youtube channel: builtinsbykreg
                      if you do not have fun every day... why?
                      get up.... get out there..... get going ! rocking all day long
                      remember to give out 10 business cards a day !

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                      • #86
                        Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                        A home of that caliber requires something more artsy. A photo wont do....
                        Attached Files
                        --William P--

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                        • #87
                          Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                          What about a photo of this calibur.....
                          Attached Files

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                          • #88
                            Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                            At least you didn't put a caulking gun in Gary's hand!
                            You will ask what goal the U.S. is pursuing? .... their external debt is huge, and ruining other countries is their customary method. Even ownership of the global 'printing press' is no longer helping. Nor is full control over NATO, None of that if enough for the 21st century colonizers. They don't just need to preserve the dollar as the only global currency but also to get their hands on the economic wealth of other large powers and regions. - Sergei Naryshkin

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                              Ya know with all due respect to the rule that everyone is entitled to their own opinion I think the categorical condemnation of a "stacked fireplace" is overly simplistic and demonstrates a level of design naiveté that we as carpenters sometimes have.

                              A stacked fire place is not a bad ugly thing just because it's a stacked fireplace.

                              It's only a bad ugly thing only when it's done without any consideration toward how it's done and how it relates to the other design elements in a room or building.

                              I don't see anything at all wrong with the fireplace jwork101 posted in Post #1. It was very well proportioned and I think it works well in that setting. It helps make that nook appear as room in and of itself. Take away the upper mantel and it's all just one big expansive room.

                              The one that DavidD posted in Post #6 was mediocre at best and probably done just for the sake of doing something with all that brick. I think a large painting or mirror would have been a better choice.

                              Ya know when this subject first came up in another thread here and everyone was piling on with the criticism of one the photos posted I looked at it and immediately thought of this fireplace I had seen in a photograph of Vatican architecture. And geez stacking architectural elements is seen all through classical architecture. That doesn't mean it's always right in much the same vein that just because Joe Blow here doesn't like it doesn't mean its always wrong.

                              On the cover of the Robb Report Luxury Home Winter 2006 issue there's a room with a stacked fireplace it looks great.

                              Ignore, disrespect, and disregard the stacked mantel at your peril of leaving the greater profits for someone else.
                              J. Jerrald Hayes
                              360Difference.com | ParadigmProjects.com
                              Paradigm Building & Remodeling | StairScapes

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                              • #90
                                Re: The infamous "stacked" fireplace

                                Jerrald,

                                With all due respect, I maintain my opinion that the stacked fireplaces in these threads look ridiculous.

                                I have no formal training in design or architecture, so I can't articulate exactly why I feel this way, but it seems that somehow the proportions are wrong.

                                Although the room in the Robb Report appears to be very nice (The photo is too small to make out a lot of detail), I believe the stacked fireplace seriously detracts from the room.

                                Remember all the fads and fashions that were showcased in the 1970's? They were considered cool then, but many of these things are laughed at today. Some design elements stand the test of time, others don't.

                                I think the concept of a stacked fireplace is questionable, not just the executions shown. But, I won't rule out that the possibility that there could be a nice one. I'm doubtful though.

                                >>Ignore, disrespect, and disregard the stacked mantel at your peril of leaving the greater profits for someone else<<

                                I already leave a lot of profit for others, because other things in life are more important to me. I wouldn't refuse to do a stacked mantle, but I'm certainly not going to encourage them. I prefer to do work that I believe in and can be proud of. If that's not available, well, yes, I have to eat.
                                "If you only have a hammer, all problems look like nails"

                                Vintage wood window repair and restoration in Chicago
                                Wood storm windows in Chicago
                                Weatherizing vintage buildings in Chicago

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