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What is the Best glue for furniture (interior)?

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  • What is the Best glue for furniture (interior)?

    What is the best glue for solid wood dining chairs? I would like to have glue that will keep them from loosening up. I have tried several glues and none have been as good as they need to be. Does anyone have any solutions to this?

    Thank you, Joe

  • #2
    The joints are probably not tight fitting and that's why aliphatic resin glue is not holding up. If that's the case use marine grade epoxy resin adhesive. More expensive but will take care of those lose chair fittings.
    Gary

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    • #3
      I use old fashioned hot hide glue if I want to be able to repair the chairs in the future. If I don't want to be able to repair them then I will use epoxy. The problem with epoxy sis the same as with white or yellow glue, it doesn't take stain or oil finish well.

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      • #4
        I tend to agree that if the tenon is not fitting very well, then wood glue will not hold up in the long run - I have had that happen when using Titebond. Epoxy would work but as was said, you will never get it apart again. If you can take it apart, I would increase the tenon diameter or cut a kerf in the top of the tenon, put in a wedge with some wood glue and be done.
        Jason Laws
        Plain In Maine
        Amity, Maine
        plaininmaine.houzz.com



        " ... I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock: And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell not: for it was founded upon a rock" (Matthew 7:24-25 KJV).

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        • #5
          I tend to agree that if the tenon is not fitting very well, then wood glue will not hold up in the long run - I have had that happen when using Titebond. Epoxy would work but as was said, you will never get it apart again. If you can take it apart, I would increase the tenon diameter or cut a kerf in the top of the tenon, put in a wedge with some wood glue and be done.
          Jason Laws
          Plain In Maine
          Amity, Maine
          plaininmaine.houzz.com



          " ... I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock: And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell not: for it was founded upon a rock" (Matthew 7:24-25 KJV).

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          • #6
            I'd reccomend Bondo with a good primer.
            "First we finish the game, then we’ll deal with the Armada!"

            Sir Frances Drake

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            • #7
              Polyurethane glue works well, it expands as it cures.

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              • #8
                I agree with hide glue if you want to keep an old piece original and also like the suggestion of modifying the old joint to bring it back to a tight fit. Polyurethanes are very strong but it's not a substitute for a sloppy fitting joint. No right or wrong, just a matter of evaluating and deciding what will be the best fix.
                Gary

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by dgbldr View Post
                  Polyurethane glue works well, it expands as it cures.
                  from what i have read polyurethane has little strength when it expands expands .but it does make me wonder if something like pl 400 would work .

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                  • #10
                    Hide glue is best for furniture.
                    http://www.lavrans.com

                    "He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp posts; for support rather than illumination." -Andrew Lang

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                    • #11
                      I appreciate everyone responding to my post. Thank you, Joe

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                      • #12
                        if you choose to go with epoxy and have no prior experience or preference, go with WEST SYSTEM www.westsystem.com 105 Resin and for gap filling get their colloidal silica. pick your Hardener (205 fast; 206 Slow) based on ambient temperature. to "prime" the connection, first apply the mixed but unthickened epoxy. The follow up with Colloidal Silica thickened epoxy mixture.
                        Epoxy is one of thos specialized solutions you will be able to use again over time. So order their premeasuring inexpensive plastic dispenser pumps which stay in their repsctive container while stored.
                        Like everything else we are new to: practice on scrap. Try different masking tapes to find on that protects exposed wood where you don't want any squeeze out to interferre with stain or finish.
                        Wellstocked distributor: www.jamestowndistributing.com
                        TSOrganize
                        www.TSOproducts.com
                        Transport Store Organize

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                        • #13
                          Epoxy? Wood glue or something. The one that they use to fill gaps on furnitures.

                          A brand new deck or renovating an old one, Alpha One Construction can help you through the entire process, Bridgewater, Brookside, Budd Lake, Caldwell, Califon.

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                          • #14
                            You have to get the old glue out of the joint first and then apply the new glue. I've heard that taking the tenon and wrapping it with a warm/hot damp cloth will soften the old glue and let you remove it. Also found these two suggestions online:

                            From contributor T:
                            A solution of meat tenderizer is "magic" at softening/dissolving hide glue. I've syringe injected it into joints and under veneer and separated some very fragile joinery with minimal stress to the pieces and to me. It's essential to thoroughly rinse away all traces of tenderizer before regluing for obvious reasons. You can speed the release of PVA/AR glues by adding detergent to the water, again, leave no trace of detergent on the pieces.

                            From Gene Wengert, forum technical advisor:
                            The use of a detergent with warm or hot water (although you will get grain raising) is effective IF the detergent has a surfactant (which breaks the surface tension of the water allowing the water to penetrate into very small holes, gaps, etc.). Make sure you check the label as some modern detergents do not have this surfactant. The key is that the older PVAs are softened with heat and water, but it is not true for many modern formulations. - See more at: http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_bas....Eys0Pp5R.dpuf

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                            • #15
                              Try epoxy glue!

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