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  • 1x4 casing

    When installing 1x4 window and door casing with butt joints, why do most cut the header trim go over legs instead of legs all the way up and header in between. Just curious if there was a good reason.

  • #2
    I am new to forum have looked just never posted, I am a cabinet maker from Georgia and have some windows to trim out, reason for the post above.Thanks for a great forum.

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    • #3
      Think post and beam...

      http://www.jlconline.com/how-to/inte...trim-designs_o

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      • #4
        think of it as legs or columns holding up the beam that runs across the top to hold up the roof. The only way you want to see a window trimmed with them long and the casing in between would be for trim that has 45 degree cuts.

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        • #5
          That does make sense ,its just in the cabinet business we run our door and face frame styles full length and the rails in between so the end grain is on the top and bottom ,not the sides.these windows will get a backband around them so no end grain to worry about,i just need to wrap my mind around something different for me.

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          • #6
            It is a very traditional way of doing almost any trim. My style of trim is usually without 45 degree cuts, as I don't like the look, and I think that it would look strange not to do it the traditional way. I think most peoples eyes would be drawn to that and think that it is wrong, and then start to wonder what else is wrong.

            So, not a great answer but something, I guess. I have always built cabinet doors with full length pieces on the sides just because I always though that it was stronger to do it that way and.........everyone else does it that way :-)
            Jason Laws
            Plain In Maine
            Amity, Maine
            plaininmaine.houzz.com



            " ... I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock: And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell not: for it was founded upon a rock" (Matthew 7:24-25 KJV).

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            • #7
              The trim method you are asking about is called "Butt and Pass".
              For exterior installs that method helps to protect the end grain of the side trim from the weather. The end grain of the "pass" piece or the head trim is vertical and will shed the water with the least amount of moisture being absorbed into the end grain.
              For interior purposes if you have the head piece cut between the vert. side pieces, your eye wants to follow the vertical line up to the ceiling, the "butt and pass" style "encloses" the window with the trim components. If you check out a window or a door, they, like your cabinets, are constructed with the stiles extending to the edge of the frame,and the rails running in between. The trim around the door or window unit "captures" the component with-in a "frame" and makes it look complete.
              The concept of the mitered corners really goes to a production method that tries to maintain the "enclosure" idea but allows for a quicker installation process. The other method of terminating the trim would be to use corner blocks to "end" the vertical trim, and the head trim as well.

              Geoff

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Graacc1 View Post
                The trim method you are asking about is called "Butt and Pass".
                For exterior installs that method helps to protect the end grain of the side trim from the weather. The end grain of the "pass" piece or the head trim is vertical and will shed the water with the least amount of moisture being absorbed into the end grain.
                For interior purposes if you have the head piece cut between the vert. side pieces, your eye wants to follow the vertical line up to the ceiling, the "butt and pass" style "encloses" the window with the trim components. If you check out a window or a door, they, like your cabinets, are constructed with the stiles extending to the edge of the frame,and the rails running in between. The trim around the door or window unit "captures" the component with-in a "frame" and makes it look complete.
                The concept of the mitered corners really goes to a production method that tries to maintain the "enclosure" idea but allows for a quicker installation process. The other method of terminating the trim would be to use corner blocks to "end" the vertical trim, and the head trim as well.

                Geoff
                Excellent answer! I wasn't even thinking about exterior trim when I answered, but I like your answer to everything else much better than mine.
                Jason Laws
                Plain In Maine
                Amity, Maine
                plaininmaine.houzz.com



                " ... I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock: And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell not: for it was founded upon a rock" (Matthew 7:24-25 KJV).

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                • #9
                  Thanks,I believe you've convinced me

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                  • #10
                    Instead of rails and stiles thinks legs and head, The legs support the head. Sometimes the head goes passed the legs. Other times the head is wider then the legs and or thicker. Then sometimes there is a piece between the legs and the head like a beaded piece or neck moulding and then maybe a solid crown on top. You can see how you would like something to support the head piece as it grows more ornate. Then maybe we flute the legs and put plynth blocks at the base. Everything grew out of that leg and head foundation.

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                    • #11
                      I had never thought about it before. Learned something new.

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                      • #12
                        Another time I have learned something from this site, Thanks.

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