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Fastener Bleed, Ipe finishing

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  • Fastener Bleed, Ipe finishing

    So it looks like Timberloks bleed/cause staining in cedar & Ipe? I already knew that galvi can... Any options besides stainless? Not crazy about the contrast.

    Semi-related question, what's your favorite finish/oil for Ipe? The guy I work for these days swears by Penofin. Ipe's still kind new to me, used to use Cabot's on cedar...
    Francois


    Truth is just one man's explanation for what he thinks he understands. (Walter Mosley)

  • #2
    Re: Fastener Bleed, Ipe finishing

    For example

    http://www.manasquanfasteners.com/Headcote_products
    β€œI find the curiosity of our men with respect to this animal is pretty much satisfied.”
    ~ Meriwether Lewis

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    • #3
      Re: Fastener Bleed, Ipe finishing

      have any more on the bleed through .is the coating on the screw failing due to screwing them in ? is it due to weather .How long did it take to happen .This is new info .i thought the timberlocs were top of the line .

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      • #4
        Re: Fastener Bleed, Ipe finishing

        I have seen the Fasten master line paint fail. Mainly in the star drive units where you must scrape off the paint when driving them in and then they rust. But I think the timberlock are the hex head. I do know that if you run a timber lock in and then back it out I have seen the paint missing on the threads. It has never been a lot and maybe not on every one but I have seen it come off.

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        • #5
          Re: Fastener Bleed, Ipe finishing

          Originally posted by joseph View Post
          have any more on the bleed through .is the coating on the screw failing due to screwing them in ? is it due to weather .How long did it take to happen .This is new info .i thought the timberlocs were top of the line .
          Yeah, I thought so, too, and never noticed a problem before.

          One of the gardeners mentioned it about a cedar pergola I'd built a couple weeks before they went to do the planting. Then the same thing happened on an ipe pergola last week.

          Near as I can tell, it's the paint itself that's the problem. Like it's powdering off, and that powder is staining the wood. Bad batch?

          edit: the paint on the hex head isn't visibly scratched or anything.
          Last edited by frenchie; 07-02-2014, 07:40 PM.
          Francois


          Truth is just one man's explanation for what he thinks he understands. (Walter Mosley)

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          • #6
            Re: Fastener Bleed, Ipe finishing

            i am going to pretend it is bad batch and continue using coated screws . i was just back at a project with a lot of cedar and and screws ,i saw no bleed through . not sure what brands i use but haven't noticed a problem .

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            • #7
              Re: Fastener Bleed, Ipe finishing

              What MarkMc recommended.

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              • #8
                Re: Fastener Bleed, Ipe finishing

                Originally posted by frenchie View Post
                Semi-related question, what's your favorite finish/oil for Ipe? The guy I work for these days swears by Penofin. Ipe's still kind new to me, used to use Cabot's on cedar...
                I like Penofin too. It works best with a few coats on dense hardwoods, and good time to soak in before use. It will need re-application every couple of years, but you won't have to strip anything like with film-forming finishes, just clean it well and re-apply.
                β€œIt is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

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                • #9
                  Re: Fastener Bleed, Ipe finishing

                  Penofin is as good as anything else we've used, though I've seen it notably worn in one season (full sun exposure). Messmer's is about equal but harder to find so we usually don't bother.
                  I agree with Mark too, stainless fasteners and use the painted-head ones if you want them to hide.
                  Doug

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