Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

residental exterior lighting

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • residental exterior lighting

    I try to be helpful to my customers and know a bit about what I recommend. But with winter coming on and earlier evenings setting in I am already getting some questions about some outdoor lighting. I know that there are lots of types and styles but that is not really the question. I am looking for input on the two main types of lighting that I see installed. I am talking lights that would be installed on the house to light up sidewalks, steps, backyards, doors. And not necessarily a light right above a door but something that would illuminate the sidewalk leading up to the door as well as shed some light on the door. I do not think anyone is looking for more than a light or two per side of the house.

    I see lots of either dusk to dawn lighting or motion detector lighting. I almost never see them mixed together, it is either one or the other. I think I know some of the ins and outs of both but would like to hear if you guys have a preference. I have done a fair amount off both and it seems that the sensors are subject to not lasting as long as the lights. And I am thinking with the advent of using LED bulbs the idea of a light being on all night with a dusk to dawn is not such an energy expense as the flood lights that used to always get used for exterior lights.

    If you have a favorite brand I would like to know but most of my customers seem to want the stuff from the big box stores that they can look at. I often install it and wonder about it's quality.

  • #2
    Originally posted by m beezo View Post
    I see lots of either dusk to dawn lighting or motion detector lighting. I almost never see them mixed together, it is either one or the other.
    ​You are wrong. Every exterior motion detector light fixture I've ever seen will NOT come on during the day, i.e. it is both motion detecting and light detecting. This is nothing new, I even have a couple on my house that are probably over 20 years old and working just fine.

    Yes, continuous lighting without motion does make sense for some applications. Some neighborhood associations request that everyone leave fairly bright porch lights on all night both for good looks and safety.

    Edit: You got me curious now. Post a link to an exterior light fixture that's motion only and NOT light detecting, I'm curious if such thing exists.

    Comment


    • #3
      DG, it was not written well by me.

      What I meant is I see folks who seem to pick out a motion detector light and install that. Or else they pick out a dusk to dawn light and install that. I seldom see someone install a motion detector light on part of the house and dusk to dawn in other places, thus combining the two different types of light. Here if you were going to leave on a porch light most of my homes have a switch inside the house where you would just flip the switch each evening before you go to bed. Everything I work on was wired before they invented dusk to dawn or motion detector lights.

      I know that the lights do not come on in the daylight when they are called motion detector lights. So yes you are right, they detect motion and lighting conditions so they know when to start coming on and go off.

      hope that clears up the question

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by dgbldr View Post

        ​You are wrong. .
        dg, does that stand for decomposed granite?

        While Mark may shrug this off all I hear is the "you're wrong blablablabla"

        Not sure of you are really a Richard or the internet auto corrects your posts to that.

        I think you are a knowledgable contractor however it is difficult to tell because of your often abrasive way of responding to posts.

        Not sure if this means anything to you however you will be better heard if you can drop the "you are wrong" and find another way to respond.

        I know there are others on this forum who will take this as being too PC, maybe they are Richards as well..


        Try it, to not, depends on your intent.

        Comment


        • #5
          Beez:

          We do extensive (100k and up) landscape packages and my landscape contractor uses FX Luminaire LED lighting, both up lights and wall wash.

          I think dg is Dorian Gluckman? Did I see that in a JLC article? And I agree, too abrasive. Hope his people skills are better with clients than what I see here.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by m beezo View Post
            Here if you were going to leave on a porch light most of my homes have a switch inside the house where you would just flip the switch each evening before you go to bed. Everything I work on was wired before they invented dusk to dawn or motion detector lights.
            ​We wouldn't ever install an outside residential light fixture without a switch, regardless of whether it has any kind of sensor in it. I don't believe it would pass code, but haven't looked. At a minimum I would want to be able to turn it off when replacing the bulb.

            So this is not an issue. The dawn to dusk sensors simply relieve the occupants of the burden of turning them on and off every day.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Bill Robinson View Post
              While Mark may shrug this off all I hear is the "you're wrong blablablabla"
              Not sure of you are really a Richard or the internet auto corrects your posts to that.
              "You're wrong" is a blunt statement of fact, relating to the facts discussed, and which the other person is free to contest. Nothing personal.

              "You're a dick" is a personal attack, which I almost never engage in. However, in your case, I am always happy to make an exception. Guess why.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Allan Edwards View Post
                Hope his people skills are better with clients than what I see here.
                As soon as you become a paying client, you too can enjoy my warmer, gentler, Dale Carnegie-trained schmooziness :)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dgbldr View Post

                  "You're wrong" is a blunt statement of fact, relating to the facts discussed, and which the other person is free to contest. Nothing personal.

                  "You're a dick" is a personal attack, which I almost never engage in. However, in your case, I am always happy to make an exception. Guess why.


                  It's not personal,

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    DG,
                    I often see outdoor lighting done here without switches on them. Many a time you have to work the lights hot to change the bulbs because they are wired directly to some source of power. I am guessing since the switch is provided by the sensor that there is not another switch required.

                    That being said, I do not know if I have ever had a light like we are describing installed by an electrician to see if he provides some sort of switch for it. Most of what I have done is either replace what is there with something new and that will work, a simple swap out of the fixtures. On one or two occassions I have installed another light and the wiring say on the other side of a garage where there was not one originally. In those cases I just tap into the source that is running to the other light and install conduit or wiring to the light depending on the location.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Beez, I'll have to watch but I don't believe I've ever seen that on a residential building. It would have to be something wired in the last 30 years, and a sensor fixture installed at the same time. Before that sensors were uncommon. So on a 50-yr old house with original wiring you would have had the light on 24/7.

                      Edit: The reason I won't do that regardless of code is that 1. The HO may change their mind later and want manual control and 2. Most of the sensor lights I have installed have several modes of operation, controlled by turning them on/off in a prescribed sequence.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        DG,
                        we have a lot of homes with a detached garage. Overhead power to the garage from the house. It is switched on and off in the garage unless you use the breakers in the panel which no one would do. So in many garages there is a switch to control a few lights inside the building, then a few outlets, and one of those outlets is the power for the garage door opener. So much of the garage wiring is going to be hot all the time.

                        So you have the outside lights being hooked into one of the junction boxes and is live and so the lights are controlled by the sensor.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X