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  • Going Paperless

    Because I am an Agile Bits 1Password user (a religious one at that) I got an email today inviting me to take a look at the new upcoming 1Password 4. But the email also included a link to a "Thanksgiving Gift" of the eBook Paperless by David Sparks.

    On reading most of it earlier this morning I think this is just a great guide for developing a strategy for both "thinking" paperless and finding the right tools to accomplish that and at only $10 bucks (Paperless — MacSparky) it would be well worth it had I had to purchase it. (1Password users check your email!).

    And while this eBook is written in a very Mac IOS centric voice its useful advice and reviews of the scanning tools available are pertinent and relevant to PC Windows users too and contains a chapter "Windows Software Alternatives" too.
    J. Jerrald Hayes
    360Difference.com | ParadigmProjects.com
    Paradigm Building & Remodeling | StairScapes

  • #2
    Re: Going Paperless

    Jerrald:

    The "paperless" office is something I've been interested in for a while, to some extent we have achieved it. Although I think a more appropriate would be "less-paper" rather than “paper-less”. It has been very beneficial in adding efficiency to our company.

    If you learn any tips, send them my way. I'm always looking for ways to improve.
    ============================================

    Twitter

    Houzz

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    • #3
      Re: Going Paperless

      Going paperless isn't a new idea at all in some ways was an original part of the whole idea and pitch of moving businesses management to computers back in 70's. Paper companies even saw the computer as a threat to their business. It didn't turn out that way however.

      Paperless office - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[…]

      The "paperless office" was a publicist's slogan, intended to describe the office of the future. It was facilitated by the popularization of video display computer terminals like the 1964 IBM 2260. An early prediction of the paperless office was made in a 1975 Business Week article.[1] The idea was that office automation would make paper redundant for routine tasks such as record-keeping and bookkeeping, and it came to prominence with the introduction of the personal computer. While the prediction of a PC on every desk was remarkably prophetic, the "paperless office" was not. Improvements in printers and photocopiers have made it much easier to reproduce documents in bulk, causing the worldwide use of office paper to more than double from 1980 to 2000.[2]
      I'm thinking if I can reduce the "paper" I actually generate (and file away and store) nowadays by 90% it would still be twice what I generated back in the 1980's.
      J. Jerrald Hayes
      360Difference.com | ParadigmProjects.com
      Paradigm Building & Remodeling | StairScapes

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      • #4
        Re: Going Paperless

        Don't hire old, unattractive, divorced female bookkeepers. They will never let you go paperless.
        "First we finish the game, then we’ll deal with the Armada!"

        Sir Frances Drake

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        • #5
          Re: Going Paperless

          I think a “paperless” office isn’t about paper, it is about managing all of the written and digital information that is associated with your company. To me, “managing” means collecting and storing that information and making it readily available to the people that need it, when they need it. I want the information stored in a digital format, labeled so it makes sense and can be retrieved easily, backed up daily, and archived when the job is completed.

          The information associated with jobs are architectural and engineering plans, specifications, contracts, invoices, quotes and proposals from subs and vendors, draws, PO’s, change orders, cut sheets, selections, permits, geotech reports, emails, and photos. I recently calculated that not including emails and photos my average job generates approx. 2,000+ pages of documents. Emails and photos can add another 2,000 pieces of information, meaning we deal with 20,000-25,000 documents a year.

          It’s also important to have an actual written policy on document management.

          Jerrald, I agree there is much more paper and information generated today than there was decades ago.
          ============================================

          Twitter

          Houzz

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          • #6
            Re: Going Paperless

            I use iCloud and to tell you the truth I am a little disappointed with it so far. It hasn't lived up to my (or a lot of the other MacUsers I know) expectations.
            pitter

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            • #7
              Re: Going Paperless

              What scanner are you all using? I am still looking at the ScanSnap 1500m and the NeatDesk scanners.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Going Paperless

                T

                I have a Cannon Imageclass MF6590 printer that has has scanning function.
                Mark Parlee
                BESI(building envelope science institute) Envelope Inspector
                EDI Certified EIFS Inspector/Moisture Analyst/Quality Control/Building Envelope II
                EDI Seminar Instructor
                Level one thermographer (Snell)
                www.thebuildingconsultant.com
                www.parleebuilders.com
                You build to code, code is the minimum to pass this test. Congratulations your grade is a D-

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                • #9
                  Re: Going Paperless

                  I also have a Canon MFC with a scanner but compared to the YouTube videos of the ones I mentioned mine is slow. These two fly through the paper but your gonna spend $350 to $450 for one.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Going Paperless

                    T
                    I like those that would cut a lot of time.
                    while I was watching those videos i picked this one up as well and I need to get into using Evernote, I have the paid version, just need to efficiently use it.
                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=...ture=endscreen
                    Mark Parlee
                    BESI(building envelope science institute) Envelope Inspector
                    EDI Certified EIFS Inspector/Moisture Analyst/Quality Control/Building Envelope II
                    EDI Seminar Instructor
                    Level one thermographer (Snell)
                    www.thebuildingconsultant.com
                    www.parleebuilders.com
                    You build to code, code is the minimum to pass this test. Congratulations your grade is a D-

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Going Paperless

                      In my efforts to be paperless I have created some issues for myself. I don't carry a planner anymore as my notes and Calendar are all digital.

                      The problem is I write a lot of info down on any scrap of paper that I can find and found that my desk would have scraps of paper with details all over the place until they were handled.

                      I just bought a Moleskine notebook to carry and capture any quick notes, thoughts or details that I come across throughout my day. So far so good - I am happy with the results. I am finding that I write down more than just Job related items.

                      It also accomplishes another good thing - it's getting me writing again. Something that I have really gotten away from with all this digital stuff.
                      -Dan

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