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  • ZIP wall sheathing

    Have any builders been using this product with regular frequency?

    Allan, I saw on past posts that you have used this product on some of your homes. Are you still using it? Why or why not?

    Using the ZIP will solve the thermal bridging problem that is usually not addressed here in construction of new homes. Our concerns with using this product in the past has been flashing related issues. Since they've come out with a liquid flashing we think they've addressed these concerns.

    The product says that after installation the ZIP sheathing should be covered by an exterior veneer within six months. But doesn't address why. The full bed stone being used on the whole house will take 5-6 months to install (through winter). Should I be concerned about the sheathing breaking down?

    Thanks for feedback

    Brian

  • #2
    Re: ZIP wall sheathing

    Originally posted by gioberg11 View Post
    Using the ZIP will solve the thermal bridging problem that is usually not addressed here in construction of new homes.
    No it won't.

    Brian, ZIP has no insulation value. It is sheathing with a WRB glued to the OSB.

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    • #3
      Re: ZIP wall sheathing

      I used it on several homes when it came out, then I got away from it. One reason I am going to start using it again is I like how it holds up during the construction process, it doesn’t degrade or fade like Tyvek does. Like a lot of builders in my market we use CDX (some use OSB) and apply Tyvek over the sheathing. For wood, brick, or stone cladding most builders stop there. For stucco grade D paper is applied over the Tyvek. Typically, whatever is required by code I usually like to add an additional WRB, if 2 are required I use 3. If 1 is required, I use 2.

      With stone or brick, I will use Zip Wall and then use Tyvek or black paper over the Zip. As far as it breaking down, no I do not see or know of any evidence that Zip Wall breaks down. Mark Parlee might have more information about it.
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      • #4
        Re: ZIP wall sheathing

        Originally posted by dgbldr View Post
        No it won't.

        Brian, ZIP has no insulation value. It is sheathing with a WRB glued to the OSB.
        dgbldr,

        I should have been more specific but ZIP R-sheathing does provide, albeit, a small amount of R-value.

        http://www.huberwood.com/zipsystem/p...tem-rsheathing

        This is the product I was referring to.

        Brian

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        • #5
          Re: ZIP wall sheathing

          Allan,

          My plan is to use a drainage mat (Keene Cav-air-ator) on top of the ZIP's WRB. I've seen a lot of mortar packed behind full bed stone so instead of watching the masons' every move for six months, I'll be using a drainage mat.

          Maybe I should add a second WRB similar to the cross section below.

          Thanks for the response.

          24a2883d71d696743d22da84b9ac3f6e.pdf

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          • #6
            Re: ZIP wall sheathing

            Originally posted by gioberg11 View Post
            Allan,

            My plan is to use a drainage mat (Keene Cav-air-ator) on top of the ZIP's WRB. I've seen a lot of mortar packed behind full bed stone so instead of watching the masons' every move for six months, I'll be using a drainage mat.

            Maybe I should add a second WRB similar to the cross section below.

            Thanks for the response.

            24a2883d71d696743d22da84b9ac3f6e.pdf
            Perhaps the added drainage mat functions as a WRB? I do a dropped brickledge in order to account for excessive mortar droppings.
            ============================================

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            • #7
              Re: ZIP wall sheathing

              Originally posted by Gioberg
              My plan is to use a drainage mat (Keene Cav-air-ator) on top of the ZIP's WRB. I've seen a lot of mortar packed behind full bed stone so instead of watching the masons' every move for six months, I'll be using a drainage mat.
              I think that is wise and any stone buildings I do in the future I'm going to be doing that. I recently had masons laying up 8" thick stone still long after the home was done and occupied, sawing and chiseling each stone to create a pattern. Every time I would go by they were deliberately putting mortar behind the stone, they have become so used to using "thin stone" (about 2" thick) where they do mortar it to lath even the best masons fail to see the necessity of keeping the stone off the wall at least 2". I've been putting drainage matts under stone decks and floors for years, it's time to put it behind stone walls too.
              You will ask what goal the U.S. is pursuing? .... their external debt is huge, and ruining other countries is their customary method. Even ownership of the global 'printing press' is no longer helping. Nor is full control over NATO, None of that if enough for the 21st century colonizers. They don't just need to preserve the dollar as the only global currency but also to get their hands on the economic wealth of other large powers and regions. - Sergei Naryshkin

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              • #8
                Re: ZIP wall sheathing

                Dick,

                I was fortunate (if you want to call it that) enough to have the opportunity of laying stone with my stone masons for a few weeks in 2011. It was my first really large, full bed stone project; approximately 12,000 sq ft of stone. First, these guys are artists and never call a stone mason a "bricklayer." They don't take to kind to that.

                With my newfound stone mason skill I built a 15' tall stone fireplace in my backyard and realized that it is not necessarily just laziness when it come to tossing mortar behind the stone.

                Because of the varying depth of full bed stone, between 4"-8" deep, building up mortar behind allows you to lay a 7" stone that weighs 20 lbs perfectly on a 4" stone that weighs 8 lbs. Without the built up mortar behind the 4" stone, the 8" would never work.

                The drainage mat, while adding cost, will help me sleep well at night knowing their is an adequate drainage plain.

                Brian

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                • #9
                  Re: ZIP wall sheathing

                  20d8730db22ee90b5e332897e6852015.jpgThe truth is, if the full bed stone is the same depth then no mortar should be behind the stone.

                  I'm referring more to an irregular stone.

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                  • #10
                    Re: ZIP wall sheathing

                    Brian:

                    These were good masons, they regularly work on $50 million and up homes in Atherton and Woodside, hence my frustration with them filling the cavities, you can see from the depth of the foundation vents 070e4af94b169d5fe7d60814efe46d12.jpg what they were up against with 4" to 8" thick stone. I was going to use Schluter Troba (like I use under decks and showers) on the next one but I'm going to look into your Keene Cav-air-ator, I think it will do a much better job while allowing them to fill the cavity with mortar to their hearts' content. BTW, they did not impead drainage because water did run down behind the stone and through the fire dampened foundation vents, now I've got to go back in the next heavy rains and see what I can do about stopping that.
                    You will ask what goal the U.S. is pursuing? .... their external debt is huge, and ruining other countries is their customary method. Even ownership of the global 'printing press' is no longer helping. Nor is full control over NATO, None of that if enough for the 21st century colonizers. They don't just need to preserve the dollar as the only global currency but also to get their hands on the economic wealth of other large powers and regions. - Sergei Naryshkin

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                    • #11
                      Re: ZIP wall sheathing

                      Anytime you put a mortar product on a house you should have two layers of wrb on the home. Mortar will fill the matrix in tyvek and the perf holes in the other junk and allow moisture a direct path to the other side of the wrb. The first layer should be sacrificial with a good quality product behind it.
                      WFM Total Construction, LLC.
                      www.wfmtotalconstruction.com
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                      • #12
                        Re: ZIP wall sheathing

                        Just saw this article- what's the deal with the swelled zip boards and sunken nail heads in slide 8?
                        http://www.jlconline.com/exteriors/e...-siding_o.aspx
                        kevin
                        “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

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                        • #13
                          Re: ZIP wall sheathing

                          Originally posted by kfc510 View Post
                          Just saw this article- what's the deal with the swelled zip boards and sunken nail heads in slide 8?
                          http://www.jlconline.com/exteriors/e...-siding_o.aspx
                          kevin
                          He says it rained, the zip swelled and the nail heads punched through, but I don't think that is the case. I would bet the nails were over-driven.

                          The biggest problem with the Huber Products is that there are no real competitors.
                          "First we finish the game, then we’ll deal with the Armada!"

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                          • #14
                            Re: ZIP wall sheathing

                            Originally posted by Ted S. View Post
                            He says it rained, the zip swelled and the nail heads punched through, but I don't think that is the case. I would bet the nails were over-driven.
                            Good point- I should have said "allegedly" swelled zip boards. Over-driven nailing is a possibility. Also looks like rust bleeding from the nails, or am I seeing things? Surely galv. nails are required no? (I've never used Zip)
                            “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” - Upton Sinclair

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                            • #15
                              Re: ZIP wall sheathing

                              I saw the rust too...
                              "First we finish the game, then we’ll deal with the Armada!"

                              Sir Frances Drake

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