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White cottony mold on drywall ?

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  • White cottony mold on drywall ?

    Renovating a condo basement storage area and found this funny looking white mold on parst of the ceiling. It's pure white, and cottony looking.(first two pics)
    Any ideas what it might be from and/or the best way to handle it?
    The rest of the remediation is "normal" black mold from moisture problems (TBD) - pics 3 & 4. Any comments or recommendations (other than calling EPA) appreciated.

    JoeH
    Last edited by oldguy; 02-16-2009, 09:31 PM.
    JoeH

    There Aint No Such Thing As A Free Lunch (TANSTAAFL) -Robert A Heinlein

  • #2
    Re: White cottony mold on drywall ?

    Add'l pics of "normal" mold.
    JoeH

    There Aint No Such Thing As A Free Lunch (TANSTAAFL) -Robert A Heinlein

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    • #3
      Re: White cottony mold on drywall ?

      Each variety of mold has its own ideal growing conditions. When basements get wet, there are always differences in moisture content of the substrate, relative humidity of the air, and temperature. All of these will favor one species of mold over another.

      As far as the cleanup goes, it doesn't really matter what type of mold is there - all porous materials have to go. If you are not familiar with safe cleanup techniques (PPE, negative air pressure, isolation of workspace, etc.), have a reliable remediation company do the demo and cleanup, then you can come in and do the repairs.
      All complex problems have a simple solution. That solution is invariably wrong.

      Peter Engle, PE
      Almost Home, Inc.
      www.almosthome.com

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      • #4
        Re: White cottony mold on drywall ?

        Joe

        Just got back off of vacation; took some reading with me.
        Books on mold; a lot to know and be aware of, a lot more than I thought.
        Here is one for you;
        “All Fungi are spore producing. Some spores are asexual and some are sexual that result from meiosis. Spores enter a very low metabolic state after they are formed, and are heavily protected from desiccation and toxins by a relatively impermeable chitin containing wall. The two primary functions of spores are to tide over unfavorable periods, and to disperse the fungus to new food sources (read as reproduction). Some can survive very high temperatures. Some can survive for hundreds of years. Spores can also survive large exposures to both man made and naturally produced toxins. Spores are not easily killed by disinfectants, (forget the bleach). Imagine a fumigant that kills 99.9% of the Aspergillus spores from a colony covering a four-inch circle. Assuming 12,000,000 spores in the colony, the fumigation would leave 12,000 viable spores to start new colonies. As you see 99.9% is not good enough in this case”
        (Quoted from the book, The Illustrated Mold Handbook)

        You do need to follow Pete's advice and get someone in there that knows what is going on, keep us posted on how you proceed and what you find.
        Mark Parlee
        BESI(building envelope science institute) Envelope Inspector
        EDI Certified EIFS Inspector/Moisture Analyst/Quality Control/Building Envelope II
        EDI Seminar Instructor
        Level one thermographer (Snell)
        www.thebuildingconsultant.com
        www.parleebuilders.com
        You build to code, code is the minimum to pass this test. Congratulations your grade is a D-

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        • #5
          Re: White cottony mold on drywall ?

          Mark and Peter
          Thanks for the guidance. I've recommended that the cleanup be done by a qualified mold remediation specialist. I'll go in and make the appropriate repairs after that's done.
          And so on to the next one.........
          JoeH

          There Aint No Such Thing As A Free Lunch (TANSTAAFL) -Robert A Heinlein

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