Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Water management in crawl spaces

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    We have some combined systems in our area too. I believe at one time they just ran the sanitary and storm to the rivers arond the same time they used to dump chamber pots out of the windows, but then these systems added the treatment portion in more recent times. One property I owned had an original combined sewer system from 1880's

    Another thing that is common with these combined system is that virtually every basment I went into (and that was hundreds and hundreds), still puts their sumps into them, in spite of any city ordinances against doing so.. When the rains come, the treatment systems overflow, regardless. The city has been known to do some inspections for this problem and that works with multi family, but they can't stop someone from hooking it right back up..

    I have used an old well to pump basement sumps into before. A lot of people don't know that wells are often good at taking water. Technically we would need a DEC permit to do that. But its clean ground water so no harm no foul.
    But it sounds like the entire neighborhood was built on a swamp, and I don't think most wells could drain that much water.

    Comment


    • #17
      Pic of a backyard from a couple of years ago:

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by johnny watt View Post
        But it sounds like the entire neighborhood was built on a swamp, and I don't think most wells could drain that much water.
        Actually no. It turns out after some investigation that the soil in that area is hard clay, which means minimal permeability. So it's only a swamp when it rains hard. And that doesn't happen often. Just often enough to make it a problem.

        The well is an interesting idea, but this area never had wells. It was on city water since it was built in the 40s.

        Comment


        • #19
          dg
          Sometimes we want to help a client out but given the problems and the expensive solutions it is a tough sell. I got into a couple of these recently and spent a lot of time coming up with a correct solution but it was too much money from my clients. They are closing their eyes and plugging their ears on my recommendations and going with another idea that some inexperienced contractor sold them on. They will eventually pay the price of their errant choices but it won't' be today or next week. I presented the solution and moved on. Sometimes it is hard to let go and it ends up costing me. This may be what you have to do as well. Are you getting paid for your time spent on this project?
          About three years ago I had a crawlspace with similar problems with water and radon. The differences were the crawl was four feet deep and unvented. We installed a liner, a sump, and a radon mitigation fan. This took care of everything. The one you are describing is so screwed up there is not a simple (inexpensive) answer. If I recall correctly the dirt is to be 18" below the floor joists. If it was down that low you would have a pool that is 18" deep of water, would you not? What is the insulation design at the floor assembly?
          Can you post some pictures?

          Comment


          • #20
            Looking at picture of surrounding suface drainage, or lack of drainage, perhaps another solution is a remedy to the overall drainage pattern of neighboring yards.
            Originally designed swales and drainage patterns are disrupted by wood fences, planting beds, and ground "raise" due to root growth & mulching.
            Study the surrounding drainage possibilities, perhaps surface drainage improvements in neighborhood can alleviate standing-water issues for multiple homes.
            Instead of "fixing" the home in question.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Mark Parlee View Post
              Are you getting paid for your time spent on this project?
              Yes

              Originally posted by Mark Parlee View Post
              If I recall correctly the dirt is to be 18" below the floor joists. If it was down that low you would have a pool that is 18" deep of water, would you not?
              This one is in fact about 18" and the crawl floor is only about 2-3" below grade. No it can't really accumulate water much above the surrounding grade because the vent openings are almost at grade so water would "spill out".

              Originally posted by Mark Parlee View Post
              What is the insulation design at the floor assembly?
              Can you post some pictures?
              There are fiberglass batts stuffed between the joists, not well supported, some sagging below the joists. No pictures, I may take some next time.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by aptbldr View Post
                Study the surrounding drainage possibilities, perhaps surface drainage improvements in neighborhood can alleviate standing-water issues for multiple homes.
                Instead of "fixing" the home in question.
                That would be great but nobody offered to pay me for it.

                Comment


                • #23
                  dg,
                  Pictures would be great to make sure I understand everything.
                  Glad you are getting paid to figure it out.
                  Are the fiberglass batts faced or unfaced. No matter if they are not covered and contained it is wrong.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Couple of thoughts:
                    1 are there any signs of damage, decay or health impacts from the standing water?

                    2 this sounds like a neighborhood water management problem and calls for some larger community response and unless you want to lead the charge it is probably best to give a little guidance and move on.

                    Depending on the jurisdiction there might be some government resources to help address the problem. Better hurry though, the government will be gone soon

                    One thing for sure, fiberglass batts in most any configuration are a waste of time and in many cases can cause more damage than benefit. The most common issues are air sealing at the floor or under the floor joists and unsecured insulation.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      1. No there aren't. We don't have heavy rains more than 3-4 times a year so the problem is severe but very temporary.
                      2. Agree. Since nobody did anything in 70 years, I doubt everyone is interested or willing to spend money on it. I have lined up a couple of key people and I am confident we can solve the problems on this lot permanently. After that, we'll see if other people are interested either individually or collectively. Much will depend on how expensive the solution is.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        DG,
                        i too wonder if it is something a governmental agency, a sewer company or even a conservation agency can help with. 70 years ago there may not have been the run off from apartment or store parking lots like there are now. Even driveways that might have been gravel years ago and let water soak into the ground now let it run off to another location. We see that around here.

                        And the idea of it happening only 3 or 4 times a year do make it a tough sell sometimes. I see it in basements, in fact have it in my own basement. About once every two or 3 years we get enough rain, at the right time of year, after a freeze that I will get a small dribble across my basement floor. Pretty hard to justify spending a lot of money for an ocassional problem.

                        Wondering what solutions you are thinking of and what the cost is going to be.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X