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mdomenicis
10-18-2010, 11:35 PM
Some of you may think this is a stupid question, but I'm gonna ask it anyway...
I'm looking for a new framing gun, and don't understand the differences/ advantages of: a)the angle of the gun-20 degree versus 28 or 31 degree, and also b) clipped head versus round-head nails. Thanks, Mark

dgbldr
10-18-2010, 11:42 PM
How about filling your profile, so we know who and where you are? You may get more responses if the guys think you're legit.

bob14-0
10-19-2010, 06:05 PM
The two most common framing nailers 20 - 21 degree and 30 - 32 degree will, for the most part do the same job; with exceptions - clipped head nails, due to their steeper angle (30d) are more compact nailers but will shoot up to a 131 nail. A full round head nailer (21d) requires plastic collated nails and the head is slightly bigger, not much. With plastic collation, you have the plastic projectile to contend with as the nail is shot. So, occasionally you can get plastic shards to the eye and face. Paper collated nails (Paslode) have no such hazzard.
Sequential or bump fire is something to consider: you want a nailer that can be switched between single and bump fire; when in doubt, opt for a sequential nailer for safety.
For more information, google framing nailer, paper or plastic.

Tools Of The Trade has good articles, also crawl through reviews at Amazon for reviews, or, do a search on this site.

Good Luck,
Bob

aerieandy
10-19-2010, 08:02 PM
I think the clipped head version is able to pack more nails per strip thus saving time reloading but depending on where you are they can be a problem for sheathing and subfloor, as in my inspector will not pass clipped heads for shear nailing. If that is not an issue I would look around at your supply/lumber yard and see what they keep in stock and get the gun that takes the most readily available nails.

Andy

mdomenicis
10-19-2010, 10:46 PM
good advice... thanks, mark

mdomenicis
10-19-2010, 10:47 PM
The two most common framing nailers 20 - 21 degree and 30 - 32 degree will, for the most part do the same job; with exceptions - clipped head nails, due to their steeper angle (30d) are more compact nailers but will shoot up to a 131 nail. A full round head nailer (21d) requires plastic collated nails and the head is slightly bigger, not much. With plastic collation, you have the plastic projectile to contend with as the nail is shot. So, occasionally you can get plastic shards to the eye and face. Paper collated nails (Paslode) have no such hazzard.
Sequential or bump fire is something to consider: you want a nailer that can be switched between single and bump fire; when in doubt, opt for a sequential nailer for safety.
For more information, google framing nailer, paper or plastic.

Tools Of The Trade has good articles, also crawl through reviews at Amazon for reviews, or, do a search on this site.

Good Luck,
Bob
thanks. good info. mark

Tom Bainbridge
10-20-2010, 10:31 AM
The nail head depends on your code. Many codes are now stipulating full head nails

Hoover
10-20-2010, 06:32 PM
As Tom said, know what your code will allow. Also find out what are the easiest nails for you to get from your supply house. My guess is any supply house in your area will stock the most common, paper and plastic but just make sure. Some of the stanley guns run nails that have a wire weld and are tight spaced. Some of my local supply places don't stock the stanley all the time or they have limited sizes, coatings.

bob14-0
10-20-2010, 07:23 PM
I'm looking for a new framing gun,

All things considered, if you do end up with a paper tape clipped head nailer, I would suggest the redesigned Paslode pneumatic framer - I've been using one since spring; it's really light and well balanced, extremely powerful and safe to use - I have the switchable trigger (not that easy or fast to select) set to bounce and I haven't had one double nail to date.

For simplicity, consider a Paslode cordless gas nailer - I've used one for years and is probably all the nailer I need, but wanted a pneumatic for faster production

. BTW, Paslode makes round head nails for their nailers as well as all 30 degree nailers.

Good Luck

Bob

Dutchman
10-20-2010, 07:38 PM
My engineer says no clipped head, never...I agree. Furthermore, gun nails suck, they're very weak

Of course I use them for sticking stuff together, I'm not Amish,but I use LOTS of them.

As far as the choices for guns considering that....the big daddy is the Senco Frame Pro, and the really fun, easy to throw around one is the new Max, it only shoots up to 3-1/4" but drives them like crazy and is super light...like a kid's toy.

The plastic shrapnel, totally sucks, but it's a full head nail at least.

MKnAs Dad
10-20-2010, 09:56 PM
Couple different things to keep in mind though. If you plan on using cheap nails, go with the full head. If you plan on using name brand nails, Paslode has an offset full head nail, but is for clipped head guns. They claim that is compliant with full head codes. I would say whether inspectors will accept it though. I just found out that Duo-Fast makes a paper collated nail that is designed to fit the 20-22* nailers. I personally have both clipped and full head guns but if you aren't sure, I would go with the full head because you know they will by code compliant.