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Dancing Dan
08-01-2010, 12:03 AM
I found a used dump trailer for about half the price of a new one. It's a 6x10 w/ brakes, decent tires, etc. I've never owned one - what should I look for? We're starting a big job (most of the next year) and figured it would be worth having one, but we won't be abusing it terribly.

tomthetoolman40
08-01-2010, 12:08 AM
We have two trailers. The smaller one takes about 1/2 hour to unload by hand. The larger one with hydrolics takes about 5 min. I'd much rather push a button to unload any day.

Get hydrolics. You won't regret it.

Dancing Dan
08-01-2010, 12:09 AM
Yeah, the one I'm looking at has hydraulics.

David Meiland
08-01-2010, 12:33 AM
You gotta big truck?

davenorthup
08-01-2010, 03:29 AM
They are pretty simple trailers and the hydraulic systems are pretty basic. Common sense should dictate if it is a decent deal. I bought one last year and it is very handy you will not regret buying it.
We do not have dumpster rentals and I can have both trailers on most job sites. I use mine mostly for hauling material from the lumber yard as well as job boxes, ladders and such between jobs.

Dancing Dan
08-01-2010, 08:11 AM
Not particularly (although that is an awfully personal question) - it's a F-150 w/ 4WD.

gburnet
08-01-2010, 08:17 AM
As others have said, they're very handy to own. We bought one 6 or 7 years ago & it's been an excellent investment. They're usually dirt cheap to insure & require very little maintenance. Because of their size & mobility, you can often place them in spots where you wouldn't be able to get a dumpster in.

Be sure to check out the hydraulics & electrical on the one you're considering. Those 2 items are all that's required to make the dump mechanism operate, so if either is questionable you could be looking at an immediate repair bill. I'd also look at the brakes (I'm assuming the one in question has electric brakes), frame, hubs, & axles. Those are the usual wear areas & where you'll see signs of overloading.

6X10 is on the small side. I'd be sure that size will work for you, though at the price you're paying you could probably resell it for similar money if/when you outgrow it. I'd also like to see 2 hydraulic rams on the trailer. It may not be a deal breaker (especially on a smaller one), but having 2 rams will make for more even lifting of the box & less wear & tear on the trailer.

gburnet
08-01-2010, 08:23 AM
Not particularly (although that is an awfully personal question) - it's a F-150 w/ 4WD.

Be careful when towing heavy loads, Dan. At the minimum, make sure the truck is equipped with a brake controller. You may also want to consider adding a trans cooler & maybe even helper springs, depending on the weight you'll be towing. My experience is that everything wears faster on half ton trucks, particularly when they're routinely loaded.

Dancing Dan
08-01-2010, 08:32 AM
Yeah, it's one of my concerns. I'm not going to be using it routinely, I will definitely get brakes, and I don't think the loads will be brutal (we don't do roofing or masonry, for instance). My current truck is in reasonably good shape but I will probably go up to a 250 next time.

rogerg
08-01-2010, 10:11 AM
Every friend you ever had will want to borrow it. Put a pintle(sp?) hook hitch on it. They are about the safest hitch and none of your friends have one on their truck.

roger

tjbnwi
08-01-2010, 10:18 AM
This is the trailer towing capacity chart for a 2010 F-150, you should also have this info in the manual that came with the truck (for your year);

http://www.fordvehicles.com/assets/pdf/towing/10FLMrvF150sep09.pdf

As others pointed out brakes are an absolute must.

This is the brand controller you want, Ford went to them for their factory dash mounted unit;

http://www.tekonsha.com/product/about.asp

You may need to use an equalizing draw bar on an F-150 dependent on the load;

http://www.draw-tite.com/menu/productcontent.asp?sidemenu=productmenu2&content=main/wd&cat=1600&path=Weight%20Distribution

If you do a lot of highway driving sway controls are nice.

Tires, tires tires, and a spare, one of the most important items to be vigilant of. We all look at our truck tires and know their milage, but how many miles are on the trailers. Air pressure is very critical to their service life. "I only use it once in a while." The miles add up quickly. If the tires are smaller in diameter than the truck tires they need to turn more revolutions per mile. So they have actually traveled more miles than the truck tires.

You may also need a USDOT or state DOT (or both) number, click on "Step by Step Registration Guide" in the "Help me Register" box (So how many of you did not know you need a DOT number for your truck and trailer once the combined GVW was over 10,000 pounds?)

http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration-licensing/online-registration/onlineregdescription.htm

Tom

always-learning
08-01-2010, 10:25 AM
Dan,

I bought the 5x8 @5000 GVW dump BriMar. I've done dozens of trips from the supplier with concrete, stone, soil, mulch and even cabinets from time to time.

It's worked excellent, since day one. Single piston due to it's 3750 load capacity (it weighs 1250 unloaded). I've put 4900 + LBS in it, at times, although not by choice. It still had no real issues with towing or the hydraulics, even being overloaded.

The Brake controller is absolutely required. There's no way in hell I could stop my truck without the electric brakes coming into play. Added leaf capacity and air bags are the way to go, otherwise just buy a one ton truck and fuggaboutit...

My gripes....

Not big enough, as always, I should have bought the larger version.

The crank jack on the front of the unit sometimes catches the ground when going over uneven surfaces, as it would have been nice to be able to retract it further up.

I live on the coast, so I'm dealing with the powdercoat peeling in areas due to rust.


I have a 94 Yoda with HD springs and adjustable air bag suspension added to the truck... .....

The bags can be pumped up when hauling heavy loads to keep the truck stable and level, and this in turn keeps the cops from pulling my ass over when the back of my truck is sagging due to the trailer being overloaded. ;-)

Dont forget to re-register your tow vehicles GVW, to include the trailer's full capacity when loaded. This will cost you more to register, but at least you won't get impounded when you get pulled over pulling a load that exceeds the total capacity.

My Yoda is registered @ 10,500 which allows me to fully load the trailer , full tank of fuel, and my fat ass at the wheel, with a few pounds to spare to be under the GVW.

I also bought a spare tire & rim for the trailer..... It sucks getting a flat with a load in it.

EDIT:

As tom has pointed out you'll need a USDOT number now.....

NJ, thankfully, doesn't require it, although if I was to frequent crossing state lines, it's suggested that I get one as well.

Randy Bush
08-01-2010, 10:28 AM
I have a 6x10 with a single ram and hydrulic brakes. one of the best tools bought. Use to use a pickup box trailer took as long to unload as it did to load it now just push the button and it is empty.Have hauled some pretty heavy loads on it and works fine, Only thing might change some day is to draw battery power from my truck to operate it.

tjbnwi
08-01-2010, 10:43 AM
And don't forget--------------------once you have a spare tire you need a jack capable of lifting the loaded axle and a lug wrench of some sort. Other wise the spare is not of much good.

The road triangles will be required with the DOT number.

Randy,

You are better off leaving the trailer battery and then setting it up to charge off of the truck. The current draw loaded may be to high to run it off the vehicle battery without a very large gauge wire at that distance. Ford has a charging relay for their factory plug, so it disconnects the trailer battery when the engine is off. That way trailer loads do not drain the vehicle battery. This is more important with travel trailers.

Tom

Randy Bush
08-01-2010, 10:57 AM
Good thought Tom, although Iwas considering the heavy guage wire to do the job. My diesel has alot of battery . Nothing worse then getting to the dump and you forgot to make sure the battery was charged. Been there done that. :)

tjbnwi
08-01-2010, 11:17 AM
Randy,

Make Model Year of your truck? Plug configuration (round with 7 tangs, round 6 with round pins, flat 4) and was it a factory install? The truck/plug may be set up to charge the battery and you may have some other issue.

Carry a set of separated jumper cables with you, long enough to reach the battery, you should only need to hook up the positive lead. The ground should be available through the hitch (yes I know there is a white ground wire in the plug). If need be you can also use a jumper cable from the negative post on the trailer battery back to the hitch/frame of the truck. It need not go back to the truck battery.

My X has 2- 900 CCA batteries in it.

Tom

redwood10
08-01-2010, 11:56 AM
I also have a 6x10 Big Tex Jr.. It is one of the best investments I have made. I've had it about 10 years now.

Mine has a 10000# rating, I doubt that your f-150 can handle that.

In my area, tires are not critical. I have never worn one out yet. Too many nails at the dump have compromised their service life. Carry a can of tire seal with you.

David Meiland
08-01-2010, 12:41 PM
I don't think the loads will be brutal

Aside from the technical advice you've gotten, I would investigate the tow ratings of your truck carefully, and make absolutely sure you're not exceeding them, ever. My F150 could barely tow a utility trailer with a lawn tractor, legally speaking.

Every year they catch people around here towing huge boats with tiny trucks. I saw a 30'+ boat go by on the road the other day, towed by what looked like a 90s GMC Jimmy, the 2-door mini-SUV. The truck may be rated to tow a few thousand pounds, the boat probably weighs 7000 or something like that. If he wipes out his insurance people will giggle at him as they walk away.

Randy Bush
08-01-2010, 04:45 PM
Tom , my truck is a 93 F-350 diesel dually factory wired for towing. My other issues are my trailer only has a 4 plug, no need for brake controller seeing it has hydrulic brakes on it. And I have just never rewired it for charging the battery.

always-learning
08-01-2010, 04:51 PM
Tom , my truck is a 93 F-350 diesel dually factory wired for towing. My other issues are my trailer only has a 4 plug, no need for brake controller seeing it has hydrulic brakes on it. And I have just never rewired it for charging the battery.

Aren't those called surge brakes ?

Those work well if your brakes are adjusted properly. What I like about the Ebrakes is that you can control the stopping power based upon the load of the trailer.

If I run around with nothing in the box, I can keep the brake set to .5 If I'm hauling 2-3 tons, I set the controller to 2.5 and it stops the trailer and saves my brakes in my truck.


Flexibility is key for me, anyways....

tjbnwi
08-01-2010, 05:27 PM
Chuckles,

You are correct surge brakes.

Surge brakes are self adjusting to the load. The greater the load and/or the harder the towing vehicle is stopped the more travel of the rod into the master cylinder piston, thus the greater the brake application. Backing up and the wheels contacting something can be an issue if you forget to install the lockout pin.

Randy,

Change the plug on the trailer to a round 7. You need only add the battery charging circuit wire to the trailer. If you are looking at the back of the plug it will on the top right and should be labeled "black" that is the positive feed. White is ground bottom left. Yellow (some may still be labeled red, it is not common anymore) is left turn/brake light install center left. Tail light is brown install top left. Green is right turn/brake light install center right. The other two you will not use, bottom right is blue for the brake and the center is purple is backup lights.

All of the terminals should be labeled with the colors. Again you are looking at the back of the plug as if you were pushing it into the socket. Make certain you wire it with the small retainer screw facing up, that is the top.

Tom

Greg Di
08-01-2010, 09:54 PM
Dan,

FWIW, I have two dump trailers at the moment. That's just how handy they are. If I had more parking/storage options, I would absolutely invest in another one.

I have a 6x10 and a 7x12'.

You should heed the warnings of others here to NOT pull that trailer with a 150. It's a recipe for disaster on too many fronts. You think it won't load heavy, but you will. Not to mention that your trailer dry is over 3k. You put sides on it to increase the capacity and you'll start getting heavy quick.

magna111
08-01-2010, 11:23 PM
I thought u sold the 6x10?

ddolman
08-01-2010, 11:39 PM
We have a 7x14 big tex gooseneck and the battery/hydraulic system was poorly designed. The battery and pump are in a box just off the ground and behind the rear truck tires. It filled up with road debris and water in weeks and the electrical system was shot. We moved the pump into a plastic tool box and mounted it up on top of the gooseneck and then added 30' of welding cable to replace the onboard battery. Now we just pop the hood on the truck and clamp the welding cable to the positive battery terminal on the truck. Seems to be much more reliable.

TWhite
08-02-2010, 07:16 AM
I've had 2 Bri-Mar 6 X 10's (7,000 pounds GW) the empty weight is about 2100 pounds, add sides and your at about 2400 pounds. They were easy to pull with a F150 4 X 4 and still had about 2000 pounds of of towing capacity left. You gotta have the electric brake controller!

Greg Di
08-02-2010, 09:01 AM
I thought u sold the 6x10?

I did, however I'm still using the trailer as part of the deal.

Dancing Dan
08-02-2010, 09:17 AM
I checked w/ my mechanics - they gave me the go ahead. I'll be gentle, I promise.

Dave Frane
08-02-2010, 10:36 AM
Scott Dornbusch - who used to be active in the forums - did a story for JLC on this very topic. For anyone who is interested - see:

http://www.jlconline.com/cgi-local/viewnew.pdf/8f167ed26ef000cb8cb81f45e7144844/6b722ed2cf0af2bb1fa10957a4e33dbe/www.jlconline.com/cgi-bin/jlconline.storefront/4c56d6ae1299557d27170a32100a0674

Dave Frane
JLC

mike maines
08-02-2010, 12:49 PM
Dan, we have a 6x10 "Downeaster" with dual axles. It's a perfect size for any job not big enough for a roll-off. I'd be nervous hauling it with my F150, but it hauls great behind the company Chevy 3/4 ton. Electronic brakes are necessary, as others have said. I think ours has a single hydraulic ram, and with heavy loads like roofing or dirt sometimes it's not enough. Or, it is enough and we shouldn't overload the trailer.

Dancing Dan
08-02-2010, 04:00 PM
Can I borrow your trailer and truck tomorrow, Mike?

davenorthup
08-02-2010, 10:59 PM
Can I borrow your trailer and truck tomorrow, Mike?

That is what I was thinking when I saw that post.... :)

I 'rent' myself and truck out for others and have left my trailer on other peoples job sites, then I haul it off for them... It does have my logo on it however.. :)

I am surprised that any of them do NOT come with electric brakes. A must IMO if you are around any hills.

tjbnwi
08-03-2010, 12:25 AM
This is from the FMSCA (Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration) 393.42 (b)(4)

(b)(4) Any full trailer or four-wheel pole trailer (laden or unladen) with a gross weight of 1,361 kg (3,000 pounds) or less which is subject to this part is not required to be equipped with brakes if the sum of the axle weights of the towed vehicle does not exceed 40 percent of the sum of the axle weights of the towing vehicle.

http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/administration/fmcsr/fmcsrruletext.aspx?reg=r49CFR393.42

I believe that all of the trailers should have brakes, who is going to calculate the 40% rule with each load? Who weights their trailer until you get to the dump?

Surge brakes or electric, should be something.

A few post mention you must have a brake controller, this is only true if the trailer has electric brakes. Surge brakes do not need a brake controller. I did post a link to what I feel is the best on the market in a previous post.

If the original posters truck is a 2010 F-150 4x4 SuperCab with a 5.4 liter 3 valve V8 with a 373 differential and the proper towing equipment it is rated to tow-11,200 lbs, 1,130 lb. tongue weight ratting, with a gross combined vehicle weight of 17,100 lbs. The trailer he is looking at is well below these limits.

If he just wants to use a Class 2 draw bar in the receiver, it has a 5000 lb. gross trailer weight rating with a 500 lb. tongue weight rating.

These weights go back to '01 or '02 when Ford stared installing Class 4 receivers. 2000 model year had a Class 3 receiver limited to 10.000 lbs with the proper equipment.

Tom

mike maines
08-03-2010, 09:26 AM
LOL
Sure, are you still working in Freeport? Our new office is at 194 Main St, the trailer is out back. Oh, it's full of trash right now, so if you wouldn't mind taking care of that first....

joseph
08-03-2010, 10:55 AM
i have a 5x10 dump . the narrow width means i do not have to pay attention to it constantly . I am not dropping tires off narrow roads when another car comes round .I first towed it behind a 2500 van . this was not enough truck ,i was constantly smoking the brakes ,it would push that truck through stop signs . it is not worth an accident ,make sure truck towing it is big enough .

S. Donato
08-03-2010, 06:26 PM
i have a 5x10 dump . the narrow width means i do not have to pay attention to it constantly . I am not dropping tires off narrow roads when another car comes round .I first towed it behind a 2500 van . this was not enough truck ,i was constantly smoking the brakes ,it would push that truck through stop signs . it is not worth an accident ,make sure truck towing it is big enough .

joseph did you have a brake controller? i have a e250 and these vans are more then capable of pulling a trailer. maybe i should ask what was in the trailer when you were smoking the tires ;-)

tjbnwi
08-03-2010, 07:43 PM
joseph,

A 2500 GM product van is equivalent to what is commonly referred to as a 3/4 ton.

If you did not have trailer brakes because it was rated to a max of 3000lb GVW, this van should have had no problems what so ever handling the weight. If you followed to load limit.

If it did have trailer brakes that were not hooked up or not functioning, that is not the vans fault.

If the first scenario is true, there is something wrong with the van brakes. Most probably no or poorly functioning rear axle brakes. Fronts taking all of the load.

Anyone who has an electric brake controller and reached down and hit the panic switch, knows the trailer will damn neart bring the entire rig to a stoop in a heart beat.

Tom

joseph
08-04-2010, 04:21 PM
wow ,i got alot of feed back .it occurred to me that i hadn't really put all the info together before i spoke/wrote
well 2500 gmc van is more like a heavy duty 1/2 ton . I am not happy with the brakes on it .
the piece of info that is realitive to this thred i think is that this 5x10 trailer has 15" wheels ,the 6x10 that the poster talked about most likely has 16" wheels ,and much bigger brakes .
I really wish i had 16" wheels and bigger brakes .
brakes maynot be an issue with the 6x10 .
but imagine having brake failure .i have started putting a little oil on my plug contacts .Found a product that is for electrical contacts ,but seems like any oil might work.
love my dump trailer and hope it works out for you

Greg Di
08-04-2010, 08:27 PM
I put electric breaks on my single axle utility trailer just to take the burden off the truck. I keep the controller set at .9 and it works great.

Contrastingly, I've had to set my dump trailer all the way to 5 a couple of times (normally at 2.5/3) with heavy loads.

With trailers, it's not the pulling, it's the stopping.

greentree
08-07-2010, 08:43 AM
I've got a 6x10 with 2' sides giving me a 7.7 yard capacity. Flush to the top with shingles is around 5,000-5,500 lbs of payload and my single ram will dump it no problem. It tows fine at that weight with my Tundra and has no problem stopping. Look for all 4 wheels to have electric brakes.
Mine doesn't have power down hydros; it's by gravity which is annoying. I've also bent the ram or something in which after I dump if the box is all the way up it won't come down without a rachet strap or the transfer stations payloader pushing it down for a couple of inches then it breaks free and goes on its own so make sure you check the ram all the way up, new ones are pricey.
If you dump alot ask for a discount on your tonnage rates, I've had my trailer since '04 and just found out a month ago I've been entitled to a tonnage discount the entire time.

tjbnwi
08-07-2010, 09:52 PM
tree,

You most probably have not damaged the ram at all, if you had it would be leaking fluid.

My guess is that with the bed up all the way, there just is not enough weight on the ram to over come the check valve spring pressure. Just happens because of the position of everything. Once it transfers a little bit of load on to the ram it over comes the valve and allows the bed to comer to rest.

It has to have the valve otherwise, the bed would come crashing down.

Tom

Tom

greentree
08-08-2010, 10:48 AM
Maybe it needs to be greased or adjusted or something then because this problem just popped up in the last couple of years. You can hear it grind like crazy for an inch or two when the ram is all the way up and your putting weight on it to go down and then the grinding stops and it works fine the rest of the way.

Overbuilders
08-08-2010, 12:51 PM
1. Recyclables.
2. Unattended tools.
3. Materials you can check off your list.

Lettusbee67
08-08-2010, 04:39 PM
The body of the last person who tried to throw their crap in my trailer in the middle of the night.

BigLou80
08-09-2010, 10:18 PM
Only thing might change some day is to draw battery power from my truck to operate it.

good luck, it can be done but its not really all that feasible. The motors for the hydraulics pull a lot of amps (100+) your going to need some pretty large cable to move that kind of amperage from the front of the truck to the trailer.

BigLou80
08-09-2010, 10:52 PM
This is from the FMSCA (Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration) 393.42 (b)(4)

(b)(4) Any full trailer or four-wheel pole trailer (laden or unladen) with a gross weight of 1,361 kg (3,000 pounds) or less which is subject to this part is not required to be equipped with brakes if the sum of the axle weights of the towed vehicle does not exceed 40 percent of the sum of the axle weights of the towing vehicle.

http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/administration/fmcsr/fmcsrruletext.aspx?reg=r49CFR393.42

I believe that all of the trailers should have brakes, who is going to calculate the 40% rule with each load? Who weights their trailer until you get to the dump?

Surge brakes or electric, should be something.

A few post mention you must have a brake controller, this is only true if the trailer has electric brakes. Surge brakes do not need a brake controller. I did post a link to what I feel is the best on the market in a previous post.

All of the dump trailers I have ever seen come equipped with electric brakes, maybe its a regional thing but lack of breaks is the exception not the rule.



If the original posters truck is a 2010 F-150 4x4 SuperCab with a 5.4 liter 3 valve V8 with a 373 differential and the proper towing equipment it is rated to tow-11,200 lbs, 1,130 lb. tongue weight ratting, with a gross combined vehicle weight of 17,100 lbs. The trailer he is looking at is well below these limits.

If he just wants to use a Class 2 draw bar in the receiver, it has a 5000 lb. gross trailer weight rating with a 500 lb. tongue weight rating.

These weights go back to '01 or '02 when Ford stared installing Class 4 receivers. 2000 model year had a Class 3 receiver limited to 10.000 lbs with the proper equipment.

Tom

Those half ton weight rating are a joke. I would love to see how a F150 ( or any other make) holds up to towing 11,200 pounds. Its way to much weight IMO for a half ton truck. I would also be afraid to tow in a half ton with 1,130 pounds behind the rear axle would that even leave enough weight on the front tires to steer ?

I was riding along with my buddy in his 7.3PSD F350 towing his 2 place car trailer up a long hill in Vermont. He was telling me how he was thinking about getting a new tundra because they now had a 10K lbs towing rating. I asked him where he had the pedal to maintain the 55MPH he said it was on the floor. I then asked him if he still wanted a tundra to replace the F350. End of tundra discussion


Short of a pintle hook have you ever seen anything other then a class 2 draw bar? sometimes you can find 2 5/16" draw bars rated at 10K but that's about it. A friend of mine bought a boat trail with a 10K 2" ball mount. Ever try to find a 2" ball rated for 10K or draw bar to put it in ?

tjbnwi
08-10-2010, 12:38 AM
It is not a regional thing it is determined by the manufacture, as dictated by the FMSCA this one does not have any brakes;

http://www.bri-mar.com/trailerdetail.php?modelsid=26&categorysid=1

Someone else indicated that theirs has surge brakes.

The weights come from Fords towing manual, every part of it states that proper equipment is required to achieve the rating.

When properly equipped the weight distributing hitch transfer 50% of the tongue weight to the front axle. So yes the steering tires are in proper contact with the road. It states clearly that the maximum tongue weight without the equalizer bars is 500 lbs.

Not only have I seen them, but I have welded them at their proper tow height. Reese and DrawTite are the two most common brands. Now you can purchase bolt together heads. They do incorporate the casted area to accept the equalizer bars.

Here is a 2" 10,00 lb ball, not only did we find them, we sold them;

http://www.drawtite-hitches.com/products/Convert_A_Ball_2_Ball_Set___2_inch_and_2_5_16_inch _Balls,944-904

This is a 1200 lb/12,000 lb. adjustable head;

http://www.drawtite-hitches.com/products/Reese_High_Performance_Trunnion_Weight_Distributin g_Hitch__1_200_lbs_,66022

The draw bar is a draw bar it has no way of knowing what size ball has been installed on it.

I would rather be on the road with a properly equipped F-150, than an improperly equipped F-350. At least with the F-150 I would know the operator understood his equipment and operated it safely.

When my father owned his rental trailer towing packages were part of the business. Back then 9000-10,000 lb travel trailers were towed by the family sedan when properly equipped-----safely.

It is imperative that the entire rig is a proper system, starting with the operator, then moving to the hitching, lighting, and finally the proper brake components.

Tom