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bensonm16
02-27-2007, 04:14 PM
Is anyone aware of a sheathing product that has fire ratings of zero across the board(i.e. smoke 0, fire 0, etc) I need to sheath a brick fireplace with a 100% non combustible material 1/2" thick on top of 1 1/2" steel furring channels. The local inspector has told me that ANY type of drywall (type C, X ) is unacceptable b/c the paper will catch fire. He has also ruled out USG fiber rock panels as well. I'd like to stay away from Durock. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Matt Benson

carpenter
02-27-2007, 05:53 PM
Duraroc would have been my suggestion. Any reason for staying away from it?

Good Luck
Dave

vermarajnet
02-27-2007, 06:01 PM
I haven't used this product yet. But we were impressed with the sample. Architect specified it on a project we hope to land soon.

http://magnesiacore.com/index.html

bensonm16
02-27-2007, 07:32 PM
Dave,

The reason I wish to stay away from Durock is twofold, the edges always crumble after a cut, and I'll be cutting the materials indoor. I find the dust produced from cement based boards is more pervasive than drywall dust.

Matt

bensonm16
02-27-2007, 07:37 PM
Vermarajnet,

Do you know if this product is readily available in the US now? Their website indicates that it is only available through special order. It does appear to possess the qualities I'm looking for.

Matt

vermarajnet
02-27-2007, 08:48 PM
Vermarajnet,

Do you know if this product is readily available in the US now? Their website indicates that it is only available through special order. It does appear to possess the qualities I'm looking for.

Matt

If your interested you can request a sample. They sent us a full sheet of 1/4" by UPS (68lbs). When I talked to the sales people they said the landed cost would be 40% more than a standard sheet of sheetrock. They have dealers lined up to deliver and there are some home depot or lowes that stock the product.

Like I said I haven't actually bought any yet. I found the sales people easy to deal with: they were knowledgeable about the product and they gave us a lot of delivery options.

always-learning
02-27-2007, 08:57 PM
Is anyone aware of a sheathing product that has fire ratings of zero across the board(i.e. smoke 0, fire 0, etc) I need to sheath a brick fireplace with a 100% non combustible material 1/2" thick on top of 1 1/2" steel furring channels. The local inspector has told me that ANY type of drywall (type C, X ) is unacceptable b/c the paper will catch fire. He has also ruled out USG fiber rock panels as well. I'd like to stay away from Durock. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Matt Benson

Matt,

What material is being placed on top of this material you request? ....IOW, how is it being finished?

Durarock is the way to go. I use a carbide scoring tool...no saw & there's little dust to be developed doing it that way. thinset with FG mesh tape for the joints.....

TC2007
02-27-2007, 09:41 PM
Contact magnesiacore and see if they can help get you some. It's 100% non-combustible, comes 1/4", 3/8", 1/2" amd 5/8" thick. Like a drywall to cut and use but easier to refinish.

A lot lighter than cement board and not as difficult to work with.

A non-combustible integral non-vitrous ceramic-like solid mineral material without any paper face or other layers that can come apart or burn off. It's perfect for your application and your building inspector will love it since he has said no to drywall and cement board already.

Firehammer
02-27-2007, 10:38 PM
I know they say that Magnesiacore is non combustible but have you guys ever seen Magnesium burn? ... Actually, it doesn't really burn but explode expecially when you put water on it. I checked their website and they include magnesium composites/byproducts in the core. Some serious stuff. I am curious how they say that it's "non-combustible".

The only thing that I know that is truly non combustible is masonry. - ie - durock..

Just my .02

SolarPowered
02-27-2007, 11:08 PM
Steel lath and plaster would of course be non-combustible. But obviously a great deal more work.

TC2007
02-28-2007, 06:13 AM
I know they say that Magnesiacore is non combustible but have you guys ever seen Magnesium burn? ... Actually, it doesn't really burn but explode expecially when you put water on it. I checked their website and they include magnesium composites/byproducts in the core. Some serious stuff. I am curious how they say that it's "non-combustible".

The only thing that I know that is truly non combustible is masonry. - ie - durock..

Just my .02

After magnsium burns it becomes magnesium oxide. The ashes of magnesium can't burn again. Magnesium Oxide is used to line the inside of blast furnaces to keep iron from melting at high tempuratures and to keep more of the heat inside it or away from things since it reflects heat. You can't get more non-compustible than magnesium oxide in a building material without going to a metal. Metals tend to melt before magnesium oxide will start to decompose at somewhere north of 3000 degrees... this is also why they line the inside of blast furnaces with it that melt metals and glass.

Magnesium Oxide is what heavy duty fireproofing is made from of ever since asbestos is no longer permited.

The building inspector already said no to Durock because it cracks and crubles from heating and cooling near fire.

TC2007
02-28-2007, 06:18 AM
Steel lath and plaster would of course be non-combustible. But obviously a great deal more work.

Steel lath and plaster would crack and crumble from expansion and contraction from cycles of heating and cooing near a fire place.

TC2007
02-28-2007, 06:49 AM
Vermarajnet,

Do you know if this product is readily available in the US now? Their website indicates that it is only available through special order. It does appear to possess the qualities I'm looking for.

Matt

Yes.. It is available for delivery anywhere in North America.

Dancing Dan
02-28-2007, 12:50 PM
Contact magnesiacore and see if they can help get you some.

It's good to know about this product but would be even better if you would just tell us upfront you're from Magnesiacore (your e-mail address is just a teeny tip-off) instead of playing games.

bensonm16
02-28-2007, 12:55 PM
I checked into the price of Magnesiacore and boy is it pricey. I was quoted $150 for 4 half inch 4'x8' sheets, plus $150 for delivery. They also said the best way to ship it was to cut it into 32" x 48" sheets.

It almost seems that it would be cheaper to sheath the fireplace with sheet steel and rivits!!!

Oh yeah, in answer to a prior question; there will be a federal style fireplace surround on one side and a built in step back bookcase/ audio video cabinet on the other side. There will be no visible sheathing after my cabinets are in.

Matt

charles
02-28-2007, 07:13 PM
I recently started a thread on this very subject in the Ceramic Tile forum. Frenchie responded with some interesting search results.

Charlie__V
02-28-2007, 07:35 PM
Is anyone aware of a sheathing product that has fire ratings of zero across the board(i.e. smoke 0, fire 0, etc) I need to sheath a brick fireplace with a 100% non combustible material 1/2" thick on top of 1 1/2" steel furring channels. The local inspector has told me that ANY type of drywall (type C, X ) is unacceptable b/c the paper will catch fire. He has also ruled out USG fiber rock panels as well. I'd like to stay away from Durock. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Matt Benson

Hello Matt, & All
Newcomer here,& thought I might chime in on this one.
Perhaps the building official would consider an assembly as you describe with Mineral wool (Rock Wool) carefully fit between the steel furring.Or maybe even a panel type product like you find here,over the furring,then Type X drywall over it.(http://www.roxul.com/sw34086.asp)

Charlie

phillip
02-28-2007, 09:02 PM
asbestos sheet

pity it so hard to get now

Firehammer
02-28-2007, 10:16 PM
It's good to know about this product but would be even better if you would just tell us upfront you're from Magnesiacore (your e-mail address is just a teeny tip-off) instead of playing games.

I was wondering the same thing Dan. He seemed to be super versed on the product and since your post has not responded. Go figure...

Don_in_Idaho
03-01-2007, 12:09 AM
I'm surprised that Hardi hasn't been mentioned. That's what I like to use.

bensonm16
03-01-2007, 07:48 AM
I brought him the spec sheet on hardibacker and b/c it has a smoke rating of 5 he denied it.
Matt

frenchie
03-01-2007, 12:13 PM
Hey, Matt -

like Charles said, I did some research on this recently, you should look at that thread. It got a little confusing, but the guy from magnesiacore recently clarified some of it.

The short version is that the only 0/0 sheet product out there, aside from magnesiacore, is good old Wonderboard.

I've never had any issues with the dust as you have, but then I always score & snap (I cut one piece with a rotary tool, years ago; never again!). Over a good dropcloth, take the cloth outside & shake it after every cut if you have to, vaccum the floor as you go... no biggie.

To be honest, I'm not sure what your issue with it is. And I don't think you've got much of a choice.

Of course, I don't know what you'd use for tape on the seams, fiberglass tape probably isn't 0/0... if it's getting covered up anyways, maybe you could just use some fireblocking caulk on the cut edges & seams? Somebody please jump in here...

The only other possibility, maybe, is the steel lath & plaster idea; but that assumes that you're really good with a trowel, or that you have some old-school plasterers in your area... By the way, where are you located? You really should fill out your profile.

TC2007
03-01-2007, 12:36 PM
With magnesiacore you could cut a lap joint, T&G or buscuit in the panels and make flush slip joints with a visible micro "v"on the finish side. This will also resolve expansion and contraction of the finish wall (from the huge swings in tempurature near a fireplace) made with metal stud and board assembly. If you want to seal the panels, a fire caulk in the grooves as you put them up should work well. You can't do anything like this with cementatious based panel that are normally not easy to machine using wood working tools.

phillip
03-01-2007, 03:09 PM
look here

http://www.epp.goodrich.com/fyreroc/curr_products.shtml

bensonm16
03-01-2007, 09:26 PM
Hello All,

Firstly (is that a word?) I'd like to say thanks to Frenchie, your mastery of the search engine is impressive as well as informative. I too am French Canadian, Pouvez-vous le croire? I don't have a prob. with Durock other than the LARGE quantity of dust it produces ( I've always cut it with a 4" makita grinder w/ a dry diamond wheel) Luckily today was darn near 50 degrees and VERY rainy, perfect conditions to cut in the customers garage. I ended up floating a coat of thinset mortar over the Durock joints to produce a solid 100% non combustible surface to lay my cabinet/federal mantel on top of. Will need to do a bit of Brick work to "furr out" the firebox. I'll load some pics tomorrow night when I get in.
Secondly, thanks to ALL the replies; I've gotta say, this forum is one of the more useful tools in my inventory, I appreciate any and all help. Thanks to all.

Matt

frenchie
03-02-2007, 10:30 PM
I too am French Canadian, Pouvez-vous le croire?

Oh, I believe it. Just met a fellow Montrealais on here the other day... and two other guys that read & write fluently in french. Where you from?