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Carl Sperry
06-12-2006, 03:46 PM
I have a customer that has a two story home with brick veneer. House was built 11 years ago. All of the windows & doors have caulking that has completely pulled away from the windows/doors & is stuck to the brick. About 50% of the windows sills are buckled (warped & wavy) & the bottom corners are smashed in. In looking at the brick work it appears that the brick is settling (1" or more). Some of the gaps in between the windows & the bricks are 3/8"+. It also appears that the bricks are pulling away from the house. Several of the windows lintels are severly rusted and the mortar joints don't line up (of by 1/2"+). The windows are vinyl clad wood with a nailing flange. All my previous R&R experience has been with wood (brickmold) windows in brick. How would you go about removing the windows w/o removing the brick? As I'm looking at this more and more I think something is seriously wrong, but I can't put my finger on it. Customer also has a lot of water damage over two bay windows. I think it is from the flashing that was cut into the brick & the sealant has failed. I have not looked at it up close yet so I'm not sure.

Bill Robinson
06-12-2006, 03:59 PM
Don't suppose you have a picture do you?

Is there a brick ledge supporting the brick?

Can you tell if there are brick ties?

Other than cosmetic, is there any evidence of damage in the brick, caulk, window interface?

Bill R

Allan Edwards
06-12-2006, 04:10 PM
I have a customer that has a two story home with brick veneer. House was built 11 years ago. All of the windows & doors have caulking that has completely pulled away from the windows/doors & is stuck to the brick. About 50% of the windows sills are buckled (warped & wavy) & the bottom corners are smashed in. In looking at the brick work it appears that the brick is settling (1" or more). Some of the gaps in between the windows & the bricks are 3/8"+. It also appears that the bricks are pulling away from the house. Several of the windows lintels are severly rusted and the mortar joints don't line up (of by 1/2"+). The windows are vinyl clad wood with a nailing flange. All my previous R&R experience has been with wood (brickmold) windows in brick. How would you go about removing the windows w/o removing the brick? As I'm looking at this more and more I think something is seriously wrong, but I can't put my finger on it. Customer also has a lot of water damage over two bay windows. I think it is from the flashing that was cut into the brick & the sealant has failed. I have not looked at it up close yet so I'm not sure.
What kind of foundation?

Are there vertical expansion joints?

Are there cracks in the mortar joints?

Can you post pictures?

Carl Sperry
06-12-2006, 04:15 PM
Don't suppose you have a picture do you?

Is there a brick ledge supporting the brick?

Can you tell if there are brick ties?

Other than cosmetic, is there any evidence of damage in the brick, caulk, window interface?

Bill R


No, I dont have a picture. I can certainly take some.

There appears to be a brick ledge.

I cannot tell if there are brick ties. Some of the gaps lead me to believe that there are not any (incertain areas).

The damage I see that I find unusual is the distortion of the window sills & the smashed corners. Some of the soldier courses under the windows are running back towards the window instead of sloping away from it. A few bricks are broken but not an excessive amount. Caulking is completely not touching some windows (about 50% so far).

TSJHD1
06-12-2006, 04:18 PM
Carl,
You said the caulk has completely pulled away from the windows. Meaning, there is no caulk at all still attached to the windows?

Hopefully you can find some places where caulk still remains on the windows, and on the brick, but it has separated apart. At an area like that, look closely at the jagged edges of the caulk, and see if they look like they would fit back together, if they could be moved toward each other. If it appears that either one would have to be raised upward to be able to meet the other, that may indicate a settling problem. One component (brick or window) may have settled downward, which helped tear the caulk apart.

Even if it looks like that may have happened, the caulk may have also shrunk beyond the point where it could remain elastic. It may very well be more than one thing going on here, as you probably have already considered. You even mentioned it looked like the brick has shifted away from the house. Sounds bad, whatever it is.

Tom

Sweep8
06-12-2006, 04:20 PM
From what you have described, I think the owner should hire a structural engineer to investigate and write a report. You shouldn't take this kind of responsibility for a structrual failure. Better yet, skip it and move on.

Carl Sperry
06-12-2006, 04:33 PM
Caulking is silicone not latex or acrylic. Some windows the joint is fine. Some it is seperated a little & some are not attached to the window at all.

I have seen a few cracks in the mortar. No vertical expansion joints.

I'm going to shoot it tomorrow (weather permitting) & I'll post the pics.

Carl Sperry
06-12-2006, 04:39 PM
What kind of foundation?




Block foundation (crawl space maybe 24" high)) at least for part of the house. Soil in this area (Myrtle Beach) is either sand or clay. House is maybe 2 miles inland from the ocean.

There are no basements here & I have seen a few crawl spaces, but even those are rare.

jgroberts
06-12-2006, 06:15 PM
Any evidence of termites? I saw a house once that I could move the brick on entire side of the house. When I got inside you could see that the termites had eaten away the exterior sheathing. Mold might be another indicator of what's going on.

I don't think just new windows are going to help these folks.

Carl Sperry
06-12-2006, 06:50 PM
I have not seen any bugs. There is a water problem, but I haven't located it yet. I think it is from the flashing over the bay windows where it was cut into the brick.

Mold may be possible, but it is hidden from view if it's there.

Brickie
06-13-2006, 09:08 PM
I have not seen any bugs. There is a water problem, but I haven't located it yet. I think it is from the flashing over the bay windows where it was cut into the brick.

Mold may be possible, but it is hidden from view if it's there.


Improperly installed or lack of flashing definitely will cause the water problem.

With regards to the other problems, I would like to the photos of the brick ledge and crawl if possible.

elcalvo
06-17-2006, 06:44 PM
From what you have described, I think the owner should hire a structural engineer to investigate and write a report. You shouldn't take this kind of responsibility for a structrual failure. Better yet, skip it and move on.

This is the best advice I have read on this thread. You are describing masonry that has moved as much as one inch and mortar joints that no longer line up. You need to find out why before even thinking about windows.

You may also face a safety and liability issue here. Once you start to work on the house, if the brick lets go, who do you think will get blamed? If someone gets hurt or killed, who do you think will get blamed?

Even if you have done nothing to contribute to the collapse, think of the cost of fighting the lawsuits.

If you succesfully replace the windows, who is going to be held responsible for ongoing leaks and or deterioration in the masonry?

I could go on, but I think the horse has stopped moving.

Andrew R.
06-17-2006, 07:52 PM
I see the same problems you described often. In fact I am adding on to a house now that had 4 brick ties ina 38 x 9 wall that was torn down. The sills on the windows have rolled back like you explained. I have exposed the entire wall and foundation and the only thing I can conclude regarding the sills is that the frrame of the house shrunk and the brick veneer remained. As far as the bay windows go, there is almost no one here who uses shelf flashings relieving water dripping behind the brick to be moved to weepholes. The last time a large amount of wind driven rain was here from a brush from a hurricane there were rows of brick mcmansions in one particular neighborhood that almost all leaked at these areas.The sandy face bricks seemed to be the worst. I looked at one house that when spraying a hose on the veneer you really never got much water to cascade down the veneer, most of it was absorbed. I am the only bulder I see here who uses shelf flashings with brickwith exception of commercial buildings.

Mark Parlee
06-18-2006, 01:09 PM
Carl
Any pictures yet?

I am currently dealing with a house that is about nine years old
At this point a forensic architect has inspected and written his opinion on the fix for this house. It really reminds me of Lisa's house (from another thread)
All of the siding, sheathing, stone, brick, has to come off, including insulation removed. Then we start over.

Carl I don't mean to steal your thread. If I get this job I will start another thread to keep everyone up to date with what I find. If you decide to get involved with the one you are describing make sure you charge enough to cover everything. Make sure you include a hidden damage clause in your contract. If you want help with this take a lot of pictures and send me a disk. I will help you put something together.
The job I briefly described above is estimated at 350k with extras that may take it to aprox 450K

Mark

Stuccoman
06-18-2006, 04:14 PM
Hey Andrew, How about this brick job?

http://www.badstucco.com/bricks/bricks.htm

Brickie
06-18-2006, 08:30 PM
Hey Andrew, How about this brick job?

http://www.badstucco.com/bricks/bricks.htm


I've seen a lot worse!