PDA

View Full Version : dustfree sanding



tom dickey
09-17-2004, 06:54 AM
i work for a remodeling and maintaince company we are constantly patching walls and ceilings in occupied areas and dust is a major problem.we are loking for a preferably power sander with dust free capacity.the porter cable looks good but i have learned no to rely on what the sales guy says alone.anyone use one of these or something else simular?

tom d

Kgphoto
09-17-2004, 11:55 AM
Unless you wet sand, there is nothing that is dust free. Alternatively, apply thinner build up coats and don't sand at all. That is the process I ususually follow. Masking off air ducts and using the third hands and zip wall type things also help.

Kirk

Toolman
09-17-2004, 07:36 PM
For the past year I have accomplished numerous drywall repairs. I use a handheld sander that has a tube connected to it. You use the sanding screens with it. It is attached to a dust collector. The system collects 98% of the dust. I picked it up a Home Depot for something less then $20. I am not a big fan of power sanding drywall. First the equipment is expensive. Second it is too easy to over sand. For the most part I only sand the third coat and only have to lightly sand that. I would give this sander a try before forking over big bucks for the Porter Cable. Spend the money on a good dust collector with a HEPA filter. Hope I was of some help.

Dave NBCR
09-18-2004, 07:17 AM
The unit I have been using with very good results is much like what toolman indicated.

It’s a handheld hand sander with a long small diameter very flexible hose that connects to a bucket that uses water to collect the majority of the dust. That bucket is connected to your shop vac.

On the plus side, very affordable, extremely low tech, a small shop vac has more than sufficient power and is lightweight and compact. It comes in two sizes. The one we got is about the size of a 3 gallon pail The unit cuts the amount of air born dust to a mere fraction.

On the negative, It’s a workout, as the suction creates more friction on the wall, thus it’s harder to sand. It is noisy, the unit can really whistle at times when you step away from the wall to check your work. The unit doesn't have a pole attachment, so you have to be able to reach the entire repair by hand, making ceilings more difficult. And finally you have to clean up the sludge in the bucket frequently.

I recommend the product for small repair jobs, using it on larger jobs like a remodel wouldn’t be as feasible. In that case it easier to make the space a bubble and put a large blower in a window.

Kgphoto
09-18-2004, 02:27 PM
Hi Dave,

There is a handle attachment available for the item you mention. I had the same problem with the suction making the sanding difficult. It is even harder when pole mounted. It would be nice to find an adjustable strength vacume, but when you reduce the suction, you reduce the amount of dust collected. That is why I have gone to hot mud, more coats and little to no sanding.

Kirk

Toolman
09-18-2004, 04:53 PM
I wasn't referring to the unit that hooks up to a bucket with water in it. I tried that unit and it had all the problems that you described (too much suction and it was extremely noisy). The unit I use just comes with a flexible hose that attaches to a shop vac. I use a removable bag with a HEPA filter in the shop vac. The is no discharge of dust from the vac itself and only a very small amount from the sander (not noticeable).

Black Dog Carpentry
09-18-2004, 11:52 PM
I have the PC drywall sander. In the right hands, it does a great job, but it is very easy to over sand or to make giant swirl marks. Another drawback is that it can only get close to corners. You still have to hit them by hand. It is virtually dust free though. Another plus is that it is fast. It is great for larger scale stuff, but I do not bother with it if I have less than a complete room to sand. For small stuff and patch work, I sometimes use my 5" random orbit sander hooked to the PC vac.

Eric

SteveC
09-19-2004, 09:11 AM
I'm a solo remodeler who hangs and tapes my own kitchen and bath remodels. I use a FibaTape(?) pole sander hooked to a Fein 9-55-12 vac with 5 micron bags. Also have hand sander to touch up corners. Low noise and 99% dust collection. Sander has adjustable vent to control wall suction without sacrificing dust collection. Wet sanding is dustfree but if you haven't acquired the "touch" for spackling, it will not level the surface like dry sanding. Before getting into remodelling 20yrs ago I was a auto painter 12 yrs.and learn to "see" the surface with my hands because glossy auto paint shows everything. It tends to take me a little longer because I tend to get the walls " too good" by "seeing" too much that won't show with flat house paint.
SteveC

sbeaty
10-19-2004, 02:33 AM
I also own the PC sander and Blackdog has nailed it with his description. I love it and will be using it next week on a house I'm building, but it does not get the last 1/4-3/8" in the corners.
Stephen

Manny Davis
10-19-2004, 08:45 AM
Before getting into remodelling 20yrs ago I was a auto painter 12 yrs.and learn to "see" the surface with my hands because glossy auto paint shows everything. It tends to take me a little longer because I tend to get the walls " too good" by "seeing" too much that won't show with flat house paint.
SteveC

Nonsense.

Low angle light in general and low angle sunlight in particular will show flaws right though flat house paint -- including flaws you can't feel, and including the different textures of the face paper and joint mud. Going by feel and not by sight will result in a job that looks like crap -- and virtually any experienced drywall finisher will attest to that fact.

HenryP
10-19-2004, 11:50 AM
That is why I have gone to hot mud, more coats and little to no sanding.

Kirk

I'm with Kirk.
On smaller remodels you just need to scrape down the ridges and use the bag mix. Especially with plaster walls, it also reduces the air bubbles with regular mud. The extra pass usually takes less time than dust control and cleanup.

SteveC
10-24-2004, 09:11 AM
Manny,
"Nonsense"? I would presume by your reply you are a experienced drywall finisher.
Let me clarify that I also use light reflection and sun light, come on ! I also plan and hang boards so joints are less likely to have light shine on them in actual room lighting conditions.
SteveC